Washington State Magazine

 

Summer 2005

 

Connecting you to Washington State University, The State, The World

Features

Book Season: Washington State love its literature :: In a report released last summer, the National Endowment for the Arts warned that literary reading has declined over the last 20 years. Scary stuff, huh? So we did our own informal survey of faculty, students, and alums. Their response? Read on!

Shock Physics: Power, Pressure, and People :: After the Soviet Union tested its first nuclear device, the U.S. determined that staying ahead in the arms race would require the best scientists and the best weapons. A new federal funding model emerged, channeling money into universities around the country for research and the training of the next generation of national scientists. By the late 1950s, WSU had started on shock-wave research.

Bear Bones: A Murder Mystery :: It must have been easy to drop the body into this part of Pullman, a section that sees so little traffic. The old county road was research land where hardly anyone but the groundskeepers ventured. But somebody had an ugly secret to hide.

Panoramas

{ WEB EXCLUSIVE—Story: Birth, Death & Architecture :: Architecture professor Paul Hirzel wanted to push his students out of their mindsets. So he asked them to design a single building for both the beginning and the end of life: a funeral home/birthing center. }

Departments

:: FIELD NOTES:In Search of the Wild Chickpea

:: FOOD AND FORAGE:Asparagus

{ WEB EXCLUSIVE—Story: One-on-one: A chapter from Home Stand :: A chapter from Home Stand: Growing Up in Sports, a memoir by James McKean '68, '74 about growing up in the Pacific Northwest in the late '50s and early '60s. }

Tracking

Cover: After 54 years of diligence, Nature Boy takes a break from the west face of Holland Library for some beach and reading time with Seattle's Hammering Man. Illustration by David Wheeler.