Washington State Magazine

Spring 2012


Spring 2012

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In This Issue...

Features

On Closer Inspection—The curiouser and curiouser world of the small :: In some ways, with so much science now involving tools that detect things outside the five senses, examining the world with a microscope seems quaint. But a corps of WSU researchers—let’s call them microscopists—are wrangling photons, electrons, glowing proteins, exotic stains, and remarkably powerful devices in their pursuit of the small. by Eric Sorensen

{ WEB EXCLUSIVE—Gallery: Micrographs from WSU }

Lessons from the Forest—The anthropology of childhood :: Anthropologist Barry Hewlett has spent the last 40 years gleaning lessons from the Aka, a people who personify hundreds of thousands of years of human history. by Tim Steury

A Feast of Good Things :: How do we Washingtonians eat? The author travels from farm to table to explore and explain Washington cuisine. by Hannelore Sudermann

{ WEB EXCLUSIVE—Photo: A delicious dilemma: Ingredients for a photographic still life }

{ WEB EXCLUSIVE—Recipe: Swiss Chard with Garlicky Chickpeas }

Panoramas

{ WEB EXCLUSIVE—Video: The Amazing Leaproach (and how it can jump like that) }

{ WEB EXCLUSIVE—Video: Feeding styles demonstrated }

{ WEB EXCLUSIVE—Video: Creator of The Wire David Simon’s speech at WSU }

Departments

:: First Words: Time’s Warehouse

:: Thank you: Our 10-year event

:: Short Subject: A hidden history

:: Sports: Let him swim: The Tom Jager story

:: In Season: A cattle drive

:: Last Words: The Lowell Elm

{ WEB EXCLUSIVE—Slideshow: Life at Heart Mountain internment camp for Japanese Americans }

{ WEB EXCLUSIVE—Tips: How to cook lean beef }

Tracking

New Media

:: The Long Journey of the Nez Perce: A Battle History from Cottonwood to Bear Paw by Kevin Carson ’81

:: Good Science: The Pursuit of Truth and the Evolution of Reality by Timothy McGettigan ’95 PhD

:: The World’s Beaches: A Global Guide to the Science of the Shoreline by Orrin H. Pilkey ’57,William J. Neal, Joseph T. Kelley, and J. Andrew G. Cooper

:: All You Can Eat by Richard Harlan Miller

Cover illustration by Colin Johnson

Spring 2012
Web Exclusives

Gallery: Life at Heart Mountain internment camp

| © Washington State University

George Hirahara and his family, including Frank ’48, had their lives in Yakima disrupted in 1942 when they were forced to relocate with about 10,000 other Japanese Americans to Heart Mountain, Wyoming.

Frank’s daughter Patti Hirahara has shared a number of items with Washington State University from her family’s internment experience. They include about 2,000 photographs and negatives, many of them showing daily life at Heart Mountain.

The gallery below shows a few scenes from the Heart Mountain internment camp: celebrations, school days, sports events, and daily routines.

The complete collection is housed at WSU’s Manuscripts, Archives, and Special Collections, where students, scholars, and descendants of other families interned at Heart Mountain can access these historical records.

Courtesy WSU Libraries (Manuscripts, Archives, and Special Collections)

Categories: History, Library and museum studies | Tags: Japanese-Americans, World War II, Internment camps