Washington State Magazine

Spring 2011 cover


Spring 2011

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In This Issue...

Features

Outside In—Architecture of the Pacific Northwest :: Architecture in the Pacific Northwest has always had to contend with the environment. The results are enchanting. by Hannelore Sudermann

The Song Is You—An instinct for music :: What is music good for, anyway? by Eric Sorensen

Back in the Earth—Putting ancestors to rest, or destroying the past? :: Over the last two decades, tribes have been invoking the Native American Graves Protection and Recovery Act to reclaim remains of their ancestors from museum and research collections across the country. But what if those remains are 10,000 years old? by Tim Steury

Essay

The Strength of Moral Capital :: For people living on the margins of U.S. society, struggling with both poverty and job loss, there is still a desire to conceive of themselves as inheritors of some version of the American Dream. by Jennifer Sherman

Panoramas

{ WEB EXCLUSIVEVideo: Gary Brinson gives advice for investors in the 2010s }

{ WEB EXCLUSIVEVideo: The EcoWell story }

{ WEB EXCLUSIVEGalleries: Paintings of Washington pioneers by Worth D. Griffin and a selection of Griffin’s sketches and other artwork }

Departments

:: FIRST WORDS: Nature Boy reads on

:: SPORTS: Run to greatness

:: IN SEASON: Dungeness crab

:: LETTERS

:: SPORTS: Hit or be hit

:: LAST WORDS: Canjo

{ WEB EXCLUSIVEVideo: How to clean a crab }

{ WEB EXCLUSIVEVideo: John Elwood plays the Cougar Fight Song and other music on the canjo }

{ WEB EXCLUSIVEGallery: John Elwood’s canjos and studio :: Photographs by Zach Mazur }

Tracking

{ WEB EXCLUSIVEGallery: Images from Kim Fay’s book Communion: A Culinary Journey through Vietnam :: Photographs by Julie Fay Ashborn }

Cover photo: Architect Rex Hohlbein ’81 sits with clients Jim and Ann in an open sliding window of their home in Clyde Hill. by Michael Mathers.

{ WEB EXCLUSIVEStory: About the cover: The Hinoki House by Michael Mathers }

Spring 2011
Web Exclusives

Video: How to clean a crab

| © Washington State University

Jim Haguewood demonstrates how to clean a crab. Haguewood, a 1981 graduate of Washington State University's hotel and restaurant management programs, has been eating and cleaning crab for as long as he can remember. His family owned the Haguewoods Restaurant in Port Angeles, Washington, for 58 years.

He is a former director of the Clallam County Economic Development Council and works with the Dungeness Crab and Seafood Festival in Port Angeles.

Jim says his favorite way to eat Dungeness crab is the simplest: cooked in salted water and then chilled.

Read more in "Dungeness crab"

Categories: Food, Culinary Arts | Tags: Video, Crab, Dungeness