Washington State Magazine

Fall 2009


Fall 2009

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In This Issue...

Features

Master Gardeners :: "Cultivating plants, people, and communities since 1973" is how the Master Gardeners explain themselves. The concept has worked well. Washington, where it all started, now has over 3,000 volunteer Master Gardeners, who in exchange for training in turn give their knowledge and expertise to others in their communities. These communities have now spread across the United States and Canada. by Hannelore Sudermann

{ WEB EXCLUSIVE–Gallery: Photographs of the Master Gardeners and their work, by Zach Mazur. }

{ WEB EXCLUSIVE–Gallery: Photographs from 1973 Master Gardener plant clinics in the Tacoma Mall }

The Shape of Things to Come :: "Life is a process of self-assembly," says biochemist Alex Li. Proteins make up our hair and muscle, our brains and lungs, our enzymes and antibodies, and each one must attain a particular shape in order to do its work. Which they do with no outside help, following specific assembly codes built into their structure. by Cherie Winner

Finding Chief Kamiakin :: A new biography of Kamiakin from Washington State University Press finally pulls together the history, legend, and cultural memory of a great chief, a powerful leader of both tolerance and will. by Tim Steury

{ WEB EXCLUSIVE–Gallery: The Nespelem Art Colony and Chief Kamiakin's descendants }

{ WEB EXCLUSIVE–Gallery: Sketches by Gustavus Sohon of the Walla Walla Treaty Council }

Panoramas

{ WEB EXCLUSIVE–Video: Poised for playing Can changing position improve trumpet-playing?}

{ WEB EXCLUSIVE–Video: Tour of the virtual WSU in Second Life }

{ WEB EXCLUSIVE–Test: Sensation seeking scale }

{ WEB EXCLUSIVE–Map: Puff Volcanic Ash Tracking Model }

{ WEB EXCLUSIVE–Video: Garfield-Palouse High School students build a lift for disabled farmers to get into combines }

Departments


{ WEB EXCLUSIVE–Story: An interview with WSU men's basketball coach Ken Bone }

Tracking

Cover photo: Master Gardener class notes, composed and photographed by Tabitha Borchardt, a graduate of the program and an intern at the Washington Park Arboretum in Seattle and the Bellevue Demonstration Garden.

Fall 2009
Web Exclusives

Puff Volcanic Ash Tracking Model

| © Washington State University

Alaska map-Mt. Redoubt area

Click on an initial eruption height below to watch a predictive ash dispersion animation based on current atmospheric conditions.

The Puff model is a volcanic ash tracking model developed at the University of Alaska Fairbanks. It has been supported by University of Alaska Fairbanks and its Geophysical Institute, the Alaska Volcano Observatory, and the Arctic Region Supercomputing Center. Click here to go directly to the UAF Puff Web site where you can track ash for other Pacific Rim volcanoes including Washington’s Mount St. Helens.

Also on this site you can find ash tracking 3D simulations using Google Earth.

Click on the Initial eruption height:
( A new browser window will launch.)

4 km ----------- 13,000 ft
6 km ----------- 20,000 ft
8 km ----------- 26,000 ft
10 km ----------- 33,000 ft
12 km ----------- 40,000 ft
14 km ----------- 46,000 ft
16 km ----------- 52,500 ft

This model requires windfield data on a geographic grid covering the area over which ash may be dispersed. Representative ash particles are initiated at the volcano's location and then allowed to advect, diffuse, and settle within the atmosphere. The location of the particles at any time after the eruption can be viewed using the post-processing software included with the model. The information provided on this site is purely for educational purposes, and should not be used for actual volcanic monitoring and predictive purposes.

The University of Alaska and the Geophysical Institute are not responsible for content provided on this page.

Categories: Earth sciences | Tags: Volcanoes, Geology