Washington State Magazine
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Tag: Makah

4 article(s) found with this tag.

Edward Claplanhoo ’56—Bah-duk-too-ah: August 8, 1928–March 14, 2010
Fall 2010
Ed Claplanhoo ’56 was chairman of the Makah Tribe in Neah Bay when a winter storm in 1970 eroded the bank above the beach at Cape Alava on the Olympic Peninsula coast, revealing the village of Ozette. The village, ancestral home to many
Categories:
Alumni, Cultural studies
Tags: In memoriam, Native American leaders, Makah, Ozette


A memorial and a blessing
Fall 2008
At the western edge of the Makah Nation village of Neah Bay sits a tidy new park. It marks the spot where 216 years ago Spanish explorers built the first European settlement in the continental United States west of the Rockies and north of San Fr...
Categories: History, Cultural studies
Tags: Native Americans, Makah


A Dialogue with the Past
Summer 2008
A fierce Pacific storm in February 1970 revealed early remains of Ozette, on the Olympic Coast between Cape Flattery and La Push. Worried about the site's vulnerability to looters and further storms, Makah tribal leader Ed Claplanhoo '56 called archaeologist Richard Daugherty at Washington State University, commencing an 11-year excavation of the site. The excavation yielded thousands of well-preserved artifacts and a wealth of clues to the history and culture of Makahs and other coastal tribes.
Categories: Archaeology, Anthropology
Tags: Makah, Ozette, Northwest history, Native Americans


The Home of My Family: Ozette, the Makahs, and Doc Daugherty
Spring 2008
Perhaps the most remarkable thing about Ozette is the cultural continuity. Makahs had lived in Ozette for 2,000 years and probably much longer. The village had been abandoned for only 60 years, and many Makahs still went there to fish and hunt. One elder called the exposure of the longhouses by the storm "a gift from the past."
Categories: Archaeology
Tags: Makah, Ozette, Native Americans