Washington State Magazine

Summer 2011 - Field and Stream


Summer 2011

Field and Stream

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In This Issue...

Features

The Storyteller—Patrick McManus ’56, ’59 MA :: Patrick McManus’s comic formula depends on his creation of a world of oddly named characters with generous and adventurous souls. And a markedly different perspective. “As far back as I can remember,” he writes, “I have seen funny. What may horrify normal people may strike me as hilarious.” by Tim Steury

{ WEB EXCLUSIVE–Story: The Lady Who Kept Things by Patrick McManus, 1957 }

{ WEB EXCLUSIVE–Story: About the editorial illustration: The Storyteller—A triple portrait by Derek Mueller with Daniel Vasconcellos (Mouse over the illustration to reveal more about McManus and the artists) }

What’s the Catch? :: The rainbow trout has evolved over millions of years to survive in varied but particular circumstances in the wild. The hatchery rainbow flourishes in its relatively new, artificial surroundings, but its acquired skill set compromises its evolution. The rainbow has so straddled the worlds of nature and nurture, says biologist Gary Thorgaard, that it has become “a world fish.” by Eric Sorensen

{ WEB EXCLUSIVE–Map: Trout fishing in Washington :: 2011 rainbow trout stocks in Washington lakes by the Department of Fish and Wildlife }

{ WEB EXCLUSIVE–Gallery: Rainbow trout :: Illustrations by Joseph Tomelleri }

The Things We Do for Our Dogs—and what they do for us :: In 1974 between 15 and 18 million dogs and cats were killed in animal control centers. To address what he perceived as “wide-spread irresponsible animal ownership,” Leo Bustad ’49 DVM created the People-Pet Partnership and promoted research into the human-animal bond. Although it is impossible to assess the total impact of his work, the number of animals killed today is down to four million. And the pet-people bond manifests itself in ways beyond his comprehension. by Hannelore Sudermann

{ WEB EXCLUSIVE–Gallery: Cougs and their dogs WSU alums, faculty, staff, and family with their dogs...send in your own}

Panoramas

{ WEB EXCLUSIVE–Gallery: Vintage clothes :: Apparel from WSU's collection }

{ WEB EXCLUSIVE–Video: Interview with Al Jazeera English correspondent Ayman Mohyeldin :: With Lawrence Pintak on Northwest Public Television's The Murrow Interview }

Departments

:: FIRST WORDS: Somewhere in France

:: SHORT SUBJECT: Business is blooming

:: SPORTS: From Burma to the Blazers

:: LETTERS

:: IN SEASON: Carrots

:: LAST WORDS, ER...LAUGH: The Perfect Hunt

{ WEB EXCLUSIVE–Video: Build a bouquet of local flowers }

Tracking

{ WEB EXCLUSIVE–Story: Food and drink pairings with fudge :: by Kristine Vannoy ’87 }

New media

:: Fishes of the Columbia Basin: A guide to their natural history and identification by Dennis Dauble ’78

:: A Home for Every Child by Patricia Susan Hart ’91 MA, ’97 PhD

:: Murder at Foxbluff Lake by Jesse E. Freels ’99

:: Hard Water by Massy Ferguson


Tracking

Henry Grosshans—1921-2010

by | © Washington State University

Henry Grosshans came to Washington State College in 1952, engaging in an active academic and intellectual life for three decades, after which he retired to Shoreline, Washington. Grosshans died last October, at the age of 89.

He was for many of those years editor of the University Press, raising its prestige and profile not only through the titles published, but through the journals he attracted to the press.

Before coming to WSC, Grosshans was a Rhodes Scholar, studying for two years at Oxford University between brief stints on the faculty at Kansas State and Bowling Green University. During World War II, he participated in the D-Day Invasion and was commanding officer of a gunboat in the South Pacific.

Whatever his influence as a member of the Rhodes Scholar selection committee for Washington, he certainly added greatly to the intellectual climate at Washington State that sent six student scholars to Oxford between WWII and the late 1950s.

Grosshans was a member of the Honors College faculty and wrote a major text, The Search for Modern Europe. He also wrote Hitler and the Artists and German Dreams and German Dreamers as well as writing and recording radio shows on Russian literary figures.

His wife of over 60 years, Donna Ruth Grosshans, passed away in 2008. He is survived by son Geoffrey, daughter Annie, and their families. 

Categories: WSU faculty | Tags: In memoriam, Rhodes Scholar, WSU Press, Honors College

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