Washington State Magazine

Summer 2002


Summer 2002

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In This Issue...

Features

The pull of rowing :: Because rowing is more timing and rhythm than just strength, top athletes sometimes become frustrated. They must learn to be patient and accountable to their teammates. by Pat Caraher

{ WEB EXCLUSIVE–Gallery: Photographs of WSU crew by Robert Hubner }

Is nothing sacred? :: Never heard of C4 photosynthesis? Now you have. It's rare, it's cool, it could help feed the world. And WSU plant scientists just rewrote the textbook on it. by Mary Aegerter

Pants that fit...In search of a cure for misfits :: "The more I sewed," says Carol Salusso, "the more I got frustrated with the fact that the patterns didn't fit me." So she began designing her own. by Andrea Vogt

A Titan's Tale :: Bill Nollan didn't like not understanding. So he drove his athletes and his students ever harder. As if their lives depended on it. by Bill Morelock

Field Notes

Ukraine: Witnesses to an Uncertain Revolution :: How do you offer a reasonable criticism of America's consumer culture to an audience waiting desperately for basic goods that we take for granted? by Paul Hirt

Ukraine: Mining Every Opportunity for Hope :: There are many toasts, to friendship and Ukraine and its women, who maintain what is left of its social fabric. story & photos by Tim Steury

Panoramas

Departments

Tracking the Cougars

Cover: Washington State University varsity crew members Dorothea Hunter, Emily Raines, and Jaime Orth bend their backs to the oars on the Snake River. Read the story here. Photograph by Robert Hubner.

Tracking
Frances Penrose Owen

Frances Penrose Owen

Frances Penrose Owen dies March 9 at 102

© Washington State University

Former Washington State University regent Frances Penrose Owen died March 9, 2002 in Seattle. She was 102.

Governor Albert Rosellini appointed WSU’s first woman regent to the board in 1957. She served for 18 years and was twice elected president. In 1979, WSU’s new science and engineering library was named in her honor.

Eleven years later, when Mrs. Owen was presented with the Medal of Merit, the state’s highest award, WSU president emeritus Glenn Terrell said, “Frances is a rare combination of strength, gentleness, intelligence, and forcefulness.”

Mrs. Owen’s life was filled with service. She was elected to the Seattle School Board in 1945 and served until 1967. During her 22-year tenure, she was president four times. The Frances Penrose Auditorium at Seattle School Board headquarters was named for her in 1989. She also was on the board of Children’s Hospital in Seattle for 36 years, where she served as trustee president and chair of the building committee.

The Walla Walla native was a magna cum laude graduate of Whitman College, where her father, Stephen B. L. Penrose, was president for 40 years. She held a master’s degree in education from Harvard. After working for Frederick & Nelson department store in Seattle for a decade, she retired as personnel manager and married Henry B. Owen.

Categories: WSU history | Tags: Regents

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