Washington State Magazine

Winter 2001


Winter 2001

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In This Issue...

Features

Mariner Mania :: A new hero surfaced every game. Ichiro, Bell, Boone, Martinez, McLemore, Olerud, Cameron, Garcia, Sele. by Pat Caraher

Cataclysm, Light, & Passion :: Even though the Washington wine industry is in its relative infancy, it is playing with the big boys. How did it get so good so quickly? by Tim Steury

The Laguna's Secrets :: On the shore of the Laguna Especial, some 30 locals of all ages watch patiently, no doubt mentally rehearsing the crazy gringo stories they'll share tonight over dinner. The archaeologists are the best show on the mountain. by Tim Steury

Peter Van Sant Thrives on a "48-Hour" Day :: Peter Van Sant hasn't seen it all. But he hasn't missed much either. by Pat Caraher

State Route 26 Revealed :: Pepto pig, abandoned barns, dueling windmills, poplar trees that grow 15 feet a year. Revealing the soul of a highway. by Andrea Vogt

Panoramas

Departments

Tracking

ASK DR. UNIVERSE: What came first, the chicken or the egg?

Cover: Winemaker Cheryl Barber-Jones ('76 Food Science), of Silver Lake Winery. Read the story. Photograph © 2001 Laurence Chen, www.lchenphoto.com.

Tracking
John Gorham

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John Gorham received the Gold Head Cane Award in July from the Hartz Mountain Corporation for his work in the epidemiology of certain animal diseases. In 1993 he won WSU's Regents Distinguished Alumnus Award.

Gorham earns award for animal disease research

© Washington State University

John Gorham, longtime professor of veterinary microbiology and pathology in the College of Veterinary Medicine at Washington State University, received the Gold Head Cane Award in July. The award from the Hartz Mountain Corp. recognizes his landmark contributions to the epidemiology of certain animal diseases, some of which also affect humans.

Gorham is an international authority on slow-virus disease research in animals. He is perhaps best known for his 1953 co-discovery of the microorganism responsible for salmon poisoning in dogs and foxes.

In recent years, Gorham’s research group has worked on three fronts—developing a diagnostic test for scrapie in sheep; investigating the molecular biology, immunology, and epidemiology of hemoparasitic diseases; and bovine herpes viruses.

Gorham holds two degrees from WSU, including a D.V.M. earned in 1946. In 1993, he received the WSU Regents Distinguished Alumnus Award, the highest honor the University bestows on its graduates.

Categories: Veterinary medicine, Awards and honors, WSU faculty | Tags: Animal health

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