Washington State Magazine

Winter 2001


Winter 2001

[+]
In This Issue...

Features

Mariner Mania :: A new hero surfaced every game. Ichiro, Bell, Boone, Martinez, McLemore, Olerud, Cameron, Garcia, Sele. by Pat Caraher

Cataclysm, Light, & Passion :: Even though the Washington wine industry is in its relative infancy, it is playing with the big boys. How did it get so good so quickly? by Tim Steury

The Laguna's Secrets :: On the shore of the Laguna Especial, some 30 locals of all ages watch patiently, no doubt mentally rehearsing the crazy gringo stories they'll share tonight over dinner. The archaeologists are the best show on the mountain. by Tim Steury

Peter Van Sant Thrives on a "48-Hour" Day :: Peter Van Sant hasn't seen it all. But he hasn't missed much either. by Pat Caraher

State Route 26 Revealed :: Pepto pig, abandoned barns, dueling windmills, poplar trees that grow 15 feet a year. Revealing the soul of a highway. by Andrea Vogt

Panoramas

Departments

Tracking

ASK DR. UNIVERSE: What came first, the chicken or the egg?

Cover: Winemaker Cheryl Barber-Jones ('76 Food Science), of Silver Lake Winery. Read the story. Photograph © 2001 Laurence Chen, www.lchenphoto.com.

Panoramas

From the President: Quality and Reputation

by | © Washington State University

I COMPLIMENT THOSE WHO PARTICIPATED in creating this new publication—Washington State Magazine. To me, it is an extension of the “World Class, Face to Face” spirit that pervades Washington State University today. I hope that our readers will learn more about things that are vital and interesting to them and that they will also come to better understand the depth and breadth of the University.

Washington State University has nearly 2,000 faculty with a vast range of interests and expertise. Together, they occupy and utilize millions of square feet of modern facilities equipped with the latest technologies and equipment. Our tenure standards are high, and our commitment to excellence is pervasive. The physical plant of our University never fails to impress visiting faculty and scientists from around the world. And the breadth of interests is mind-boggling.

Take a mental walk with me to a faculty lounge on one of our campuses. Drinking coffee at one table, we find the director of the art museum, a medieval historian, an expert in business finance, and a scientist who works with grizzly bears. Across the room the participants in a lively discussion include a pharmacologist, a performer/composer, a plant geneticist, and a broadcast journalist. All are recognized around the world as leaders in their fields.

For many years we have been known as one of the leading schools in agriculture and the sciences related to it. We are proud of the great accomplishments of our faculty in these areas and have been successful in letting the world know about them. Perhaps too successful! Not long ago I was meeting with a man whose support for our University is very important to us. As usual, I started telling stories about the remarkable work going on at Washington State University, including examples from performing arts, physics, and molecular science. I was just starting to discuss a program in our engineering college when he stopped me. He said, “Lane, it sounds to me like Washington State University is more than an agricultural school.” I think I made a good recovery, but I cannot get that comment out of my mind.

If the public, including our constituencies, fully understands the mission, standards, and commitment of Washington State University, they will also know that adherence to those guides will assure excellence in every area. If we do it, we do it right. As the icing on the cake, we also have that special Cougar touch, a personal commitment to every student and an emphasis on faculty-student contact. That is different from many other large research universities. I really am proud to be associated with this great university.

Categories: WSU faculty, WSU history | Tags: WSU presidents

Comments are temporarily unavailable while we perform some maintenance to reduce spam messages. If you have comments about this article, please send them to us by email: wsm@wsu.edu