Washington State Magazine

Fall 2004


Fall 2004

[+]
In This Issue...

Features

A Little Bronze—Strategically Placed :: Although it might be better known for wine and wheat, Walla Walla is also home to one of the most prominent fine-art foundries. For a short time this fall, 32 sculptures cast at the Walla Walla Foundry will reside at 13 locations across the Pullman campus.

{ WEB EXCLUSIVE–Gallery: A little bronze—Strategically placed Photos by George Bedirian. }

Tracking Trucks :: One heavily-loaded eighteen-wheeler can cause the same highway damage as 7,000 cars. Ken Casavant and other transportation economists are trying to make sense of the effects of trucks on the state's highways.

{ WEB EXCLUSIVE–Gallery: Truck Drivin' Man Photos by Rajah Bose of the romance of trucking. }

No Hollow Promise :: Half of all new public-school teachers quit within five years, and the best and brightest are often the first to go. Worse, the attrition rate at high-needs schools is even greater. The CO-TEACH program at WSU decided to change this situation.

An Exquisite Scar :: The beauty of the channeled scablands comes from unimaginable catastrophe.

{ WEB EXCLUSIVE–Gallery: Images of Washington's Channeled Scabland Photos by Robert Hubner. }

Carlton Lewis—Still Building Bridges :: The early 1970s were tumultuous years on the WSU campus. As student body president, Carlton Lewis helped keep things from boiling over. Now he presides over Devcorp Consulting Corporation, a project management company with teeth.

Panoramas

Departments

:: SEASONS/SPORTS:Big little man Bill Tomaras

Tracking

Cover: Edison Elementary teacher Jacqui Fisher '00 with students Dillon Skedd, Alejandrina Carreño, Jorge Herrera, Kylee Martinez. Photograph by Laurence Chen.

Panoramas
WSU received a $20,000 grant from Nike and the National Recycling Coalition to install FieldTurf in the play area at the Children's Center.

[+]

WSU received a $20,000 grant from Nike and the National Recycling Coalition to install FieldTurf in the play area at the Children's Center. Robert Hubner

FieldTurf

[+]

Robert Hubner

FieldTurf

[+]

Robert Hubner

Recycled shoes furnish Kid's Cave

by | © Washington State University

FieldTurf now provides soft landings for more than 160 pre-school children playing in the "Kid's Cave" at Washington State University. In April the 16- by-21-yard carpet was installed in the alcove beneath the WSU Children's Center, formerly Rogers-Orton Dining Hall. The same rubberized synthetic material covers WSU's football and baseball fields.

Judi Dunn headed the successful effort to collect 5,500 pairs of running shoes to qualify for a $20,000 grant from Nike and the National Recycling Coalition.

"I think I personally touched each shoe," says Dunn, who is WSU's recycling education coordinator. Rubber from the discarded shoes is chewed up and used in the FieldTurf base.

The drive started in November 2001. Collection sites were set up on campus, in downtown Pullman and Spokane, and at WSU Tri-Cities. From the beginning, Dunn had the Kid's Cave in mind for the Nike grant. Students in marketing were enlisted to help promote recycling tired running shoes. Plastic water bottles, bumper stickers, and Nike key rings were awarded for best displays.

Nick Cochran, senior in Fine Arts from Enumclaw, created the colorful floor-to-ceiling mural that covers the walls of the cave. The underwater scene features diving whales and dolphins.

Categories: Recreation | Tags: Children, Recycling

Comments are temporarily unavailable while we perform some maintenance to reduce spam messages. If you have comments about this article, please send them to us by email: wsm@wsu.edu