Washington State Magazine

Fall 2009


Fall 2009

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In This Issue...

Features

Master Gardeners :: "Cultivating plants, people, and communities since 1973" is how the Master Gardeners explain themselves. The concept has worked well. Washington, where it all started, now has over 3,000 volunteer Master Gardeners, who in exchange for training in turn give their knowledge and expertise to others in their communities. These communities have now spread across the United States and Canada. by Hannelore Sudermann

{ WEB EXCLUSIVE–Gallery: Photographs of the Master Gardeners and their work, by Zach Mazur. }

{ WEB EXCLUSIVE–Gallery: Photographs from 1973 Master Gardener plant clinics in the Tacoma Mall }

The Shape of Things to Come :: "Life is a process of self-assembly," says biochemist Alex Li. Proteins make up our hair and muscle, our brains and lungs, our enzymes and antibodies, and each one must attain a particular shape in order to do its work. Which they do with no outside help, following specific assembly codes built into their structure. by Cherie Winner

Finding Chief Kamiakin :: A new biography of Kamiakin from Washington State University Press finally pulls together the history, legend, and cultural memory of a great chief, a powerful leader of both tolerance and will. by Tim Steury

{ WEB EXCLUSIVE–Gallery: The Nespelem Art Colony and Chief Kamiakin's descendants }

{ WEB EXCLUSIVE–Gallery: Sketches by Gustavus Sohon of the Walla Walla Treaty Council }

Panoramas

{ WEB EXCLUSIVE–Video: Poised for playing Can changing position improve trumpet-playing?}

{ WEB EXCLUSIVE–Video: Tour of the virtual WSU in Second Life }

{ WEB EXCLUSIVE–Test: Sensation seeking scale }

{ WEB EXCLUSIVE–Map: Puff Volcanic Ash Tracking Model }

{ WEB EXCLUSIVE–Video: Garfield-Palouse High School students build a lift for disabled farmers to get into combines }

Departments


{ WEB EXCLUSIVE–Story: An interview with WSU men's basketball coach Ken Bone }

Tracking

Cover photo: Master Gardener class notes, composed and photographed by Tabitha Borchardt, a graduate of the program and an intern at the Washington Park Arboretum in Seattle and the Bellevue Demonstration Garden.

Last Words
<em>This Land is Your Land, This Land is My Land: Issues of Eminent Domain</em> Photography by Don Normark. WSU Museum of Art, October 1-December 19, 2009.

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This Land is Your Land, This Land is My Land: Issues of Eminent Domain Photography by Don Normark. WSU Museum of Art, October 1-December 19, 2009.

<em>This Land is Your Land, This Land is My Land: Issues of Eminent Domain</em> Photography by Don Normark. WSU Museum of Art, October 1-December 19, 2009.

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This Land is Your Land, This Land is My Land: Issues of Eminent Domain Photography by Don Normark. WSU Museum of Art, October 1-December 19, 2009.

“Photographers deal in things which are continually vanishing...”

by | © Washington State University

“Photographers deal in things which are continually vanishing...”

—Henri Cartier-Bresson

In 1948 20-year-old photographer Don Normark walked up a hill in Los Angeles looking for a good view. Instead he found Chávez Ravine, site of three ramshackle Mexican-American neighborhoods tucked into Elysian Park “like a poor man’s Shangri-La,” he thought. He spent much of the next year photographing this uniquely intact rural community. Accepted by the residents, he returned often with his camera to witness a life that, though limited by poverty, was lived fully, openly, and joyfully.

In 1950 the people received letters telling them that they must sell their homes to the government and leave the ravine to make way for a low-cost housing project. As soon as they were constructed, the letter promised, “you will have first chance to move back into the new residences.” But once the people were removed, the next city government, citing “creeping Socialism,” cancelled the program. Later, the city gave 300 acres of Chávez Ravine to Walter O’Malley, who demolished the last of the houses and built Dodger Stadium.

In 1997 Normark found many people from the destroyed neighborhoods. Ties of family and friendship have held them together over the years, so that although widely scattered, they are still a group. They call themselves Los Desterrados, The Uprooted.

Categories: Cultural studies, Photography | Tags: Chavez Ravine, Latinos

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