Washington State Magazine

Spring 2002


Spring 2002

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In This Issue...

Features

Nurses to the homeless :: Gypsy's camp is evidence of the harsh living conditions faced by a growing number of homeless in Spokane. It also doubles as a classroom, and a lesson in reality, for student nurses. By Andrea Vogt.

A campus full of wonders :: All over campus, curiosities emerged from closets to form one of the most popular and unusual shows ever to fill the art museum. By Tim Steury.

What don't we know? :: James Krueger wants to know why the average person will spend 219,000 hours asleep. By James Krueger and Tim Steury.

Memories are made of this :: Neuroscientists Jay Wright and Joe Harding can approximate Alzheimer's symptoms in a rat by injecting a certain protein into its hippocampus. What's more, they can reverse those symptoms. By Tim Steury.

Catherine Mathews Friel is thankful for...Life in a small college town :: Catherine Friel has lived in Pullman nearly 100 years, and she has some stories to tell. By Pat Caraher.

Opening Day...a great way to reunite Cougars :: Cougars batten their hatches and hoist their mainsails. By Pat Caraher.

Fiction

The Peking Cowboy :: He wanted to tell the story in the third person, but it came out in the first; he wanted to tell it in the past, but it came out happening in the now; even if he wanted to, he could not change a word of it, its sequence and language clarifying its own shape and direction in his voice. A short story by Alex Kuo.

Panoramas

Departments

Tracking

Cover: Student Jennifer Schwarzer and Intercollegiate College of Nursing instructor Carol Allen. Read the story here. Photograph by Ira Gardner.

Tracking

Shanthi delivers 350-pound calf

© Washington State University

The wait is over.

Shanthi, a 25-year old Asian elephant (Washington State Magazine, Nov. 2001), delivered a 325-pound male calf November 25, 2001 at the National Zoo in Washington, DC.

Janine Brown (’80 M.S., ’84 Ph.D. Animal Sci.) coordinated the artificial insemination of Shanthi 21 months earlier. A former graduate student of Jerry Reeves, professor of animal science at Washington State University, she is the senior endocrinologist at the Smithsonian Institution National Zoological Park.

Shanthi was given to the zoo in 1976 by the people of Sri Lanka, where she was orphaned as a baby. She delivered her first calf, Kumari, at the zoo in 1993, but it died of a viral infection.

Brown’s laboratory conducts hormone analyses of blood samples for more than three dozen zoos. She consults on reproductive problems in elephants, rhinos, and exotic cats and is reproductive advisor for a group that makes recommendations for breeding captive elephants.

Categories: Veterinary medicine, Alumni | Tags: Elephant

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