Washington State Magazine

Spring 2006


Spring 2006

[+]
In This Issue...

Features

Ghost Towns of the Anasazi :: For the past three decades, WSU archaeologists and their students have been searching the Southwest with tools ranging from trowels to computers to uncover the story of a vanished people. by Hannelore Sudermann

Bridging Two Cultures :: A small school district radically retools to serve its Hispanic students. by Hannelore Sudermann

The Secrets of Sweet Oblivion :: What happens in our brains when we go to sleep—and what happens to us if we don't sleep enough—are questions that keep this research team up at night. by Cherie Winner

Panoramas

{ WEB EXCLUSIVE—Story: Better living...through solar by Tina Hilding }

Departments

:: PERSPECTIVE: Words on words

:: SPORTS: When Pullman was a ski town

:: FOOD & FORAGE: Eat more garlic

Tracking

{ WEB EXCLUSIVE—Story: James Donaldson's Journey by Scott Holter }

{ WEB EXCLUSIVE—Recipe: Chef Betsy's Chipotle Shredded Pork Burritos }

Cover: Johannes Vermeer (Dutch, 1632-1675), A Maid Asleep, 1656-57. Oil on canvas, 34½ x 30 1/8 in. (87.6 x 76.5 cm). The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Bequest of Benjamin Altman, 1913.

Panoramas
Clothesline

[+]

Robert Hubner

The Clothesline Project

© Washington State University

Haunting and colorful, the Clothesline Project usually stops students in their tracks as they head across the Glenn Terrell Mall to class. It's a display of several hundred t-shirts made by people connected to Washington State University with messages about how violence, particularly against women, can affect individuals, families, and communities. For a week last October, the campus community had a chance to read the words of victim/survivors and their friends.


Categories: Campus life, Visual arts, Fine Arts | Tags: Pullman life, Artists

Comments are temporarily unavailable while we perform some maintenance to reduce spam messages. If you have comments about this article, please send them to us by email: wsm@wsu.edu