Washington State Magazine

Summer 2008


Summer 2008

Identity

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In This Issue...

Features

Dialogue with the Past :: Coastal exploration has discovered traditional native technology for leaching tannins from acorns—identical to techniques discovered in northern Japan. Huge villages once lay near where the Deschutes and the John Day rivers enter the Columbia. And then they disappeared. A new era of Northwest archaeology is revealing that we have only started understanding the mysteries of our Pacific Northwest past. by Tim Steury { WEB EXCLUSIVE–Story: Ozette Art and the Makah Canoe }

Masters of Disguise :: When a family depends on a few head of cattle for food, for cash income, and for status, the loss of a single animal can be devastating. Researchers at WSU are on the hunt for vaccines against two of the most damaging—and elusive—pathogens that afflict livestock around the world. by Cherie Winner

The Age of Identity :: Little did literary sleuth Debbie Lee realize that by following in the footsteps of her subjects—a Javanese princess, a sailor, and a witch—she would slip out of her own identity and into theirs. by Hannelore Sudermann { WEB EXCLUSIVE–Gallery: Life and adventures of Princess Caraboo }

ESSAY

How to Survive the Coming Depression :: by Bill Morelock

Panoramas

Departments

:: FIRST WORDS

:: SPORTS: Signing Day Central

:: IN SEASON: Dahlias

{ WEB EXCLUSIVE–Gallery: Doggie donors }

Tracking

Cover photo: Fritz Meisel, age 3½, tries on a superhero identity. He is a fifth-generation resident of the Palouse and has many ties to Washington State University through his parents Jeanne Fulfs '94, MFA '03, and Nickolus Meisel, MFA '02, an assistant sculpture professor in the fine arts department.

Panoramas

A gift toward animal health

© Washington State University

The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation has committed $25 million to Washington State University toward the construction of a research building that will become the centerpiece in the new School for Global Animal Health. The new facility will provide modern research space on the Pullman campus to support global animal health research. WSU is recognized internationally for research focused on preventing transmission of animal pathogens. "You cannot identify a healthy human population in which the animals are not also healthy," says Warwick Bayly, dean of WSU's College of Veterinary Medicine.

"Humans are inextricably linked to their animals. Solving the challenge of global poverty is not possible without a focus on animals."

The school will focus on three interrelated approaches to global animal and public health: vaccine development and deployment, emerging pathogen and disease detection, and control of disease transmission from animals to humans.

The $35 million state-of-the-art infectious disease research facility will provide approximately 20,000 square feet of laboratories, office space, and meeting rooms for 12 to 15 research scientists and their support staff and graduate students. The Gates Foundation gift represents the largest single private financial commitment in WSU history. "The values of WSU's School for Global Animal Health are aligned with the mission of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, which is guided by the belief that every life has equal value and that all people should be allowed to lead healthy, productive lives," says WSU president Elson Floyd.

Categories: Veterinary medicine | Tags: Gifts, Gates Foundation, Animal health

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