Washington State Magazine

Fall 2008


Fall 2008

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In This Issue...

Features

The Higher Costs of College :: When it comes to paying the tuition, creative savvy may be a Cougar characteristic. Some do the expected--sell blood at the plasma center in Pullman, offer themselves up for psychology studies on campus, and find jobs either at the university or at a local restaurant. Others, over history, have been even more creative. by Hannelore Sudermann

{ WEB EXCLUSIVE–Our Story: How I made both ends meet }

The End Is the Beginning - a photo essay :: A Chinese native who was born during the Cultural Revolution, Jian Yang '08 found his artistic self somewhere in between his home country and the United States. That understanding of the in-between is perhaps why, on a visit home after spending some time here in graduate school, he discovered a fascination for the disappearing tradition of rural Chinese opera. by Hannelore Sudermann :: photography by Jian Yang

To Err Is Human :: The older a woman is when she conceives, the more likely it is her eggs will have abnormal chromosomes. But beyond the fact of the biological clock, we often overlook a bigger story. Even with young mothers, chromosome abnormalities are the single most frequent cause of miscarriage and birth defects. Between 25 and 30 percent of all fertilized human eggs have the wrong number of chromosomes, a rate that seems peculiar to humans. by Cherie Winner

{ WEB EXCLUSIVE–Story: Why do good eggs go bad? }

Essay

The New Virtualism: Beijing, the 2008 Olympic Games, and a new style for world architecture. by David Wang

Panoramas

{ WEB EXCLUSIVE–Video: What plants see...Changes how they grow }

{ WEB EXCLUSIVE–Video: A new biofuel crop for Washington farmers? }

Departments

Tracking

Cover photo: Sophomore Sarah Williams is borrowing money and working several jobs to help pay for college. She also sells her handmade jewelry in Pullman and on the internet to raise money to cover her school supplies. Photograph by Zach Mazur.

Departments

CUB's new, too!

© Washington State University

This fall, visitors and alumni returning to Pullman will see that campus has changed all around the stadium renovation. In fact, a far bigger project, the $86 million renovation of the Compton Union Building, is wrapping up. The '60s and '70s décor is gone, but the 1951 architectural shell remains. Now it holds a brighter, more open student union and a very large bookstore to boot.

The CUB was closed in 2006, and for two years students had to go elsewhere for food, entertainment, and to just hang out. With six floors and 235,000 square feet to renovate, the project involved rebuilding stairways, removing walls, revising the entries, and installing a new state-of-the-art auditorium as well as an updated gallery and bathrooms. "It will be a very active place," says Jeff Lannigan '95, the project manager. "It's not nearly as boxed up as it was before." Prior to the renovation, "it was kind of a rat's maze."

Some things will stay the same, though. Clevenger Lounge remains in its traditional spot, student government is still on level 3, and the credit union and mail service will be available again below the main floor.

Instead of a cafeteria, the CUB will house a variety of private food vendors as well as a full-service restaurant and a coffee house.

For game-goers, the walk to Bookie will be much shorter, since there's an elevator and elevated walkway on the north side of the CUB near the stadium to take people up and in.

The grand reopening for the CUB will run from Sept. 2-6, with a ribbon cutting ceremony scheduled for Friday, Sept. 5 at 3 p.m.

Categories: Campus life | Tags: CUB

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