Washington State Magazine

Washington State Magazine :: Summer 2013


Summer 2013

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In This Issue...

Features

The Animal Mind Reader :: Beyond the notion that animals other than humans may indeed possess consciousness, Jaak Panksepp’s work suggests a litany of philosophical implications: How should we treat animals? Do we have free will? Where might we search for the meaning of life? Are our most fundamental values actually biological in nature? by Eric Sorensen

{ WEB EXCLUSIVE—Video: The Primal Power of Play }

Something Old Something New—A history of hospitality :: When Washington State College introduced its hospitality program in 1932, no one had yet imagined an airport hotel, a drive-through restaurant, a convention center, or the boom of international travel. Eighty years later, as the industry grows in new and unexpected ways, the School of Hospitality sends its graduates out to meet its evolving needs. by Hannelore Sudermann

{ WEB EXCLUSIVE—Video: The History of Alderbrook Resort }

{ WEB EXCLUSIVE—Story: WSU’s Bell Hop }

Waiting for the Rain :: “The point of our visit was to talk about food, drought, and war. Begnemato sits in central Mali, in the east of Mopti province, where staples like millet and rice sell for six times what they did a year ago. Andoule blames their food problems on the fighting in the north and last year’s poor rains.... The previous year’s drought had depleted village seed stocks, and the conflict in northern Mali has either cut off many farmers from their fields or frightened them away.” From We Never Knew Exactly Where: Dispatches from the Lost Country of Mali. by Peter Chilson

{ WEB EXCLUSIVE—Video: On the edge of turmoil Peter Chilson talks about his experiences in Mali. }

Panoramas

{ WEB EXCLUSIVE—Excerpt: Micronesian Blues A section of WSU Professor Bryan Vila’s book Micronesian Blues, about training police officers in South Pacific islands. }

{ WEB EXCLUSIVE—Video: After Newtown: Guns in America A PBS documentary on the role of guns in U.S. culture, with WSU emeritus Professor Joan Burbick. }

Departments

{ WEB EXCLUSIVE—Video: You sunk my battleship! A look at the intramural Battleship game in Gibb Pool at WSU, courtesy of University Recreation }

Tracking

{ WEB EXCLUSIVE—Video: Greg Blanchard: WSU Chef }

New media

:: Blasphemy: New and Selected Stories by Sherman Alexie ’94

:: We Are the Bus by James McKean ’68, ’74

:: Chicago, Barcelona Connections by Greg Duncan ’98

:: WSU Cougars from A to Z by Carla Nellis ’90

:: New & Noteworthy: Planet Rock Doc: Nuggets from Explorations of the Natural World and The Whole Story of Climate: What Science Reveals about the Nature of Endless Change by E. Kirsten Peters; Blazing a Wagon Trail to Oregon: A Weekly Chronicle of the Great Migration of 1843 by Lloyd W. Coffman ’87; Career Choices for Veterinarians: Private Practice and Beyond by Carin A. Smith ’84

On the cover: Jaak Panksepp with zebra mask by Pierre-Marie Valat. Photo Robert Hubner


Posts
Horticulture and Landscape Architecture Display Garden at WSU. Emily Smudde/WSU News

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What’s new?
Replacing the greenhouses on Wilson Road, the Horticulture and Landscape Architecture Display Garden was designed and built by horticulture and landscape architecture students under former WSU professor Phil Waite ’79. Students continue to maintain the garden as part of their coursework. Emily Smudde/WSU News

Flowers in the Horticulture and Landscape Architecture Display Garden.  Emily Smudde/WSU News

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What’s new?
Flowers in the Horticulture and Landscape Architecture Display Garden. Emily Smudde/WSU News

The Horticulture and Landscape Architecture Display Garden next to French Administration.  Emily Smudde/WSU News

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What’s new?
The Horticulture and Landscape Architecture Display Garden next to French Administration. Emily Smudde/WSU News

Flowers in the Horticulture and Landscape Architecture Display Garden.  Emily Smudde/WSU News

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What’s new?
Flowers in the Horticulture and Landscape Architecture Display Garden. Emily Smudde/WSU News

The Horticulture and Landscape Architecture Display Garden. Emily Smudde/WSU News

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What’s new?
The Horticulture and Landscape Architecture Display Garden. Emily Smudde/WSU News

Flowers in the Horticulture and Landscape Architecture Display Garden.  Emily Smudde/WSU News

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What’s new?
Flowers in the Horticulture and Landscape Architecture Display Garden. Emily Smudde/WSU News

Posts for Summer 2013

© Washington State University

Florence “Flossie” Wager ’54

Flossie was my aunt, and looking for a name of a park I couldn’t recall, I Googled her and found your article. It was so fantastic and really captured her essence; your description of her smile brought a vivid image to my mind. It’s been very sad without her. She was my role model and encouraged me to go back to school (WSUV 2006–2008 English) and to pursue my master degree at Antioch University in creative writing. I graduated in December. Flossie lived long enough to know I’d be graduating, but passed before I actually did. I was one of those kids she “borrowed,” and there was never a dull moment when she was around. Her mother, Amy, who lived to be 105, had the same attitude and genes; all us Wager women hope we get the same luck. I’m not sure I’ll be floating on an inner tube down the Lewis River in my 60’s like Flossie, but I hope to continue on with some of her great work.

Thanks for reminding me how amazing Aunt Flossie was.

Chris Geraci

Vancouver 

Flossie Wager’s work with Vancouver parks was featured in the Winter 2009 issue of Washington State Magazine, “Florence Wager ’54–Vancouver park activist without par.”

How Washington Tastes

Enjoyed your article on “How Washington Tastes” re apples and cheese. One note: the Granny Smith apple was originally from New South Wales, Australia. [cf.] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Granny_Smith

The Australians will tell you about it quickly. Actually, they raise some nice apples there too. We lived in Sydney for seven years and enjoyed it. Fresh fruits and veggies are absolutely the best. Worth your time sending some horticulturalists to Australia to see the fruit and veggie stands all over the place.

Mark Welch ’62 BS 

My two daughters are graduates of WSU. They give me their Washington State Magazine and I look forward to reading it. The Spring 2013 issue has an article called “The Apple meets Cougar Gold” by Tim Steury that interests me greatly. I am a Big fan of Apples and Cougar Gold.

I believe the Gravenstein to be the best apple out there so that gives you an idea of where my tastes lie. Of course it is not a great keeper so it is rarely found at the local stores. For decades I ate an apple with lunch every day starting with the Granny Smith, then Pink Lady, and Braeburn most recently. 

The Pink Lady was good for a few years before the flavor dropped off and I switched over to the Braeburn, which was also good for a few years until its flavor dropped off. I tried a few other apples that were along the tart side of the fence but they had a blandness to them so I quit buying apples. One of those bland trial apples was the Jonagold.

Recently I discovered an apple orchard nearby that is on recently acquired State Land that is being allowed to revert back to forest. There are at least 45 varieties of apples (most have tags) and I have tried all of them. One stands out way above the others. It’s the Jonagold! So this is what a Jonagold is supposed to taste like! What the hell are they doing to those poor apples in the supermarkets? I picked several boxes of Jonagolds around the end of October and finished off the last one in mid January. They tasted the same till the end. The texture of the flesh had softened a bit but who cares with flavor like that.

My theory was that when the apple industry comes out with the so called “Next Big Thing” it sends the apple out to the world in its fresh picked state to get us hooked. Then the storage scenario begins. By that I mean fresh apples never get to the store again. I think they are picked too early as the Jonagolds I pick are not so good when picked early. Only apples out of prolonged storage are supplied until no one buys them anymore.

I wonder how long before the Honeycrisp goes bland?

This fall I will be tripling the boxes of Jonagolds I store.

I hope they fix this someday. Meanwhile I am planting Braeburns and Jonagolds.

Robert Walker 

Seabeck

Correction 

Due to mistaken information, WSM erroneously printed in the Spring 2013 issue that retired history professor O. Gene Clanton had died. He has written to let us know he is alive and enjoying retirement.

VIDEO

The Lost Country. Peter Chilson, a Washington State University professor of English, estimates he has spent six years of his life in Mali and the Sahel region of Africa. He was there at the time of last spring’s coup. Read an excerpt from his ebook, We Never Knew Exactly Where: Dispatches from the Lost Country of Mali (Foreign Policy and Pulitzer Center, 2012) on page 36. Watch a video of him discussing the current situation in Mali and his experience there at wsm.wsu.edu/extra/Chilson-Mali.

@WSUDiscovery

Twitter Viewers of crime dramas more likely to help sexual assault victims http://t.co/TQ9o8aRXnE

Twitter News #Cougs can use: Ferdinand’s ice cream shop, or shoppe, to expand. http://bit.ly/VSZJuw

Twitter WSU Neuroscientist Attempts To Re-Build The Connection In Nerve Cells http://bit.ly/UCBLbU RT @KHQLocalNews #NFL

Categories: Alumni, Agriculture | Tags: Letters, Video, Apples, Gardens

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