Washington State Magazine

Winter 2012


Winter 2012

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In This Issue...

Features

Feasting on the Salish Sea :: About 650 years ago, inhabitants of a large plank house on Galiano Island abandoned it for unknown reasons. But not before they feasted on 10,000 sea urchins. by Tim Steury

{ WEB EXCLUSIVE–Slideshow: Archaeology on Galiano Island }

{ WEB EXCLUSIVE–Gallery: Seascapes from Salish Sea, Study 2 by David Ellingsen }

A Summer of Science :: Over nine short weeks this summer, undergraduate Laurel Graves helped develop one of the first research projects to measure how much carbon wheat consumes and releases. “The entire world, all 7 billion people,” she says, “and we’re the only ones doing this thing. It’s kind of a crazy thought.” by Eric Sorensen

The Law and the Land :: Indian law attorney and Colville tribal member Brian Gunn ’95 took on the challenge of his grandfather and brought home a gratifying settlement for years of federal mismanagement of Indian trust lands. by Hannelore Sudermann

{ WEB EXCLUSIVE–Gallery: Brian Gunn and the land of the Colville Tribes }

Essay

The Ethics of Climate Change :: A political scientist, a geologist, a philosopher, and a sociologist contemplate the ethical implications of an imminent problem. by Andrew Light, Kent Keller, Bill Kabasenche, and Eugene A. Rosa

Panoramas

{ WEB EXCLUSIVE–Magazine: “Unleashed” A magazine used for education on sexual assault prevention }

{ WEB EXCLUSIVE–Video: Twin Vista Ranch }

{ WEB EXCLUSIVE–Video: Heart at KWSU in 1976 }

Departments

:: First Words: Maps, memory, and imagination

:: Posts

:: Short Subject: Spirits on the rise

:: In season: Onions

:: Sports: That voice

:: Last Words: The 1710 Senex map of North America

{ WEB EXCLUSIVE–Map: Craft distilleries in Washington }

{ WEB EXCLUSIVE–Video: Bob Robertson, Voice of the Cougars }

{ WEB EXCLUSIVE–Story and Recipes: How to choose the right onion, and some onion lore }

Tracking

{ WEB EXCLUSIVE–Slideshow: Bowling at WSU }

{ WEB EXCLUSIVE–Video: Salmon and other water videos from Chris Dunagan }

New media

:: Alpha Phi Alpha: A Legacy of Greatness, the Demands of Transcendence edited by Gregory S. Parks and Stefan M. Bradley (’98 MA History)

:: Kayaking Puget Sound and the San Juan Islands: 60 Paddle Trips Including the Gulf Islands by Rob Casey ’91

:: No Room of Her Own: Women’s Stories of Homelessness, Life, Death, and Resistance by Desiree Hellegers

:: Boocoo Dinky Dow: My Short, Crazy Vietnam War by Grady C. Myers and Julie Titone

Cover photo: Laurel Graves measures light in a wheat canopy in one of dozens of projects involving undergraduate researchers. By Zach Mazur

Last Words

The 1710 Senex map of North America

© Washington State University

There were still plenty of blank spots on maps when cartographer and engraver John Senex (circa 1678-1740) created this 1710 map of North America. It is one of 33 early eighteenth-century maps from a Senex atlas in Manuscripts, Archives, and Special Collections, acquired by the WSU Libraries in the mid-1950s. The atlas lacks a title page, but it is almost certainly Senex‚Äôs Universal Geographer, published circa 1725. It includes the bookplate of Sir Archibald Grant of Monymoske, Baronet (1696-1778), and was formerly part of his library. 

Courtesy WSU Manuscripts, Archives, and Special Collections

1710 Senex map of North America
Click the map to view a magnified version. [+]

Categories: Geography, History | Tags: Maps, Cartographers, Eighteenth century

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