Washington State Magazine
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Category: Agriculture

125 article(s) found that match this category.

A perfect vessel for wine research
Summer 2015

The new Wine Science Center at WSU Tri-Cities covers the needs of viticulture and enology researchers, students, and industry, down to the smallest details.


Categories: WSU Tri-Cities, Agriculture
Tags: Enology, Viticulture, Wine, Buildings


John Barleycorn lives
Summer 2015

Barley, around since the dawn of agriculture, has fallen on hard times. Kevin Murphy and Mary Palmer Sullivan are trying to change that.


Categories: Agriculture, Food
Tags: Barley, Beer


Billions to Be Served
Summer 2015

Scientists and chefs at the WSU Mount Vernon Research Center’s Bread Lab study local grains and traditional baking techniques to make a better loaf.


Categories: Food, Agriculture, WSU Extension
Tags: WSU Mount Vernon Research Center, Bread, Wheat, Small farms


Winter Greens—Beyond the kale
Spring 2015

Kale's growing popularity leads to a look into a whole world of winter greens, such as Salanova and chicory.


Categories: Agriculture, Food
Tags: Salanova, Winter greens, Kale


The roots of tilth
Winter 2014

Sustainable agriculture took a step forward when a group of Washington farmers, gardeners, and concerned citizens formed the nation's first organized efforts with Washington Tilth.


Categories: Agriculture
Tags: Organic foods, Sustainability, Tilth, Sustainable agriculture


Mike Seely ’84, ’09—A passion for peppermint
Winter 2014

Mike Seely and his family don't just grow peppermint. They make fine candy, including peppermint patties, available nationwide.


Categories: Business, Agriculture, Alumni
Tags: Candy, Peppermint


Let Food Be Thy Medicine
Fall 2014

What we eat can help us fight infection, combat cancer, and address disease. A number of Washington State University scientists explore the medical benefits of a cornucopia of crops.


Categories: Agriculture, Food, Health sciences
Tags: Cancer, Nutrition


Things that Fly in the Sky
Fall 2014

Over fields, over airstrips, and across WSU, drones are appearing in projects for engineering students, precision agriculture research, and general efforts to improve farming.


Categories: Engineering, Agriculture
Tags: Automated agricultural systems, Hydrogen, Drones, Unmanned aerial vehicles


Two alumni recognized for their contributions to food and agriculture
Spring 2014

Masami Takeuchi and Gail L. Cramer were honored for their work in food security, agricultural policy, and research in agribusiness.


Categories: Agriculture, Alumni
Tags: Food security, Agribusiness, Agricultural policy


The Community of the Oyster
Winter 2013

Keith Cox documented the oyster community of Willapa Bay in film, culminating in a showing at Raymond Theater that brought together generations of oystermen. 


Categories: Agriculture, Visual arts
Tags: Documentary, Oysters


Tiny seed, big prospects
Winter 2013

In 2013, the Year of Quinoa, WSU researchers are working on varieties and practices for growing the seed in diverse environments.


Categories: Agriculture
Tags: Quinoa


Of mice, men, and wheat
Winter 2013

Mice may have played a major role in the evolution of wheat, as they fed on the stores of grain harvested by humans.


Categories: Agriculture, History
Tags: Mice, Wheat, Evolution


Beans
Winter 2013
“I was determined to know beans.” —Thoreau, Walden Having abandoned journalism and returned to her family’s farm on Whidbey Island, Georgie Smith ’93 started gardening, and one thing led to another. Smith had at least two things going...
Categories: Food, Agriculture
Tags: Beans, Dry beans


The Pear
Winter 2013

The pear and the apple are quite different fruits, both in how they are eaten and in how they are grown. And where in Washington they are grown makes all the difference in how pear farmers think of their product.


Categories: Agriculture
Tags: Pears, Horticulture, Tree fruit


First Words for Fall 2013
Fall 2013

In the early 1950s, Washington State College and the Bureau of Reclamation published a Farmer’s Handbook for the Columbia Basin Project. Written for new farmers breaking ground in the newly irrigated Columbia Basin Project, the handbook offered advice to last of the pioneers in the West.


Categories: Agriculture, History
Tags: Columbia Basin Project, Farmers


Washington’s Sweet Corn Secret
Fall 2013

Washington is surprisingly one of the largest sweet corn producers in the United States. With irrigation, corn fits in nicely with the crop rotation in central Washington.


Categories: Food, Agriculture
Tags: Corn


Water to the Promised Land
Fall 2013

As an aquifer declines, Columbia Basin farmers look to water promised them 80 years ago.


Categories: Agriculture, History
Tags: Water, Columbia Basin Project, Irrigation, Odessa aquifer


Posts for Summer 2013
Summer 2013

Letters from alumni about Florence Wager and Washington apples, along with video and What's New? at WSU.


Categories: Alumni, Agriculture
Tags: Letters, Video, Apples, Gardens


Why aren’t plants more sick than they are?
Summer 2013

Why are plants immune to most of the diseases surrounding them in the environment? Lee Hadwiger, Washington State University professor of plant pathology, has been wrestling with this question most of his career. 


Categories: Agriculture
Tags: Plant diseases, Plant pathology


Let everyone eat bread
Summer 2013

WSU researchers are deciphering the genetic codes of wheat to develop a gluten-free wheat that celiac disease patients can eat.


Categories: Agriculture, Food
Tags: Genetics, Gluten free wheat, Celiac disease


Juice Grapes
Summer 2013

Almost half of all juice grapes is grown in Washington's Yakima Valley. The Concord grape, the primary source for grape juice had a long journey from Massachusetts before getting established in the West.


Categories: Food, Agriculture
Tags: Grapes, Juice grapes


Eric Zakarison ’81 and Sheryl Hagen-Zakarison ’83, ’91—Thinking small
Summer 2013

Eric Zakarison ’81 and Sheryl Hagen-Zakarison ’83, ’91 decided to use their small family farm near Pullman to raise more than wheat, adding animals and other crops to the mix.


Categories: Agriculture, Alumni
Tags: Small farms, Sustainability, Ranching


Spinach is suspect: A pathological mystery
Spring 2013

Seed pathologist Lindsey du Toit at WSU Mount Vernon has been sleuthing out why spinach has been suffering from wilt, and whether the problem comes from spinach seed mostly grown in northwestern Washington.


Categories: Biological sciences, Agriculture
Tags: Spinach, Plant diseases, Plant pathology


How Washington tastes: The Apple meets Cougar Gold
Spring 2013

One need not be an expert taster to appreciate the chemistry between the apple and Cougar Gold.


Categories: Agriculture, Food
Tags: Taste, Cougar Gold cheese, Apples, Horticulture, Cheese


Fruitful history
Spring 2013

Apple production was originally spread across eastern Washington, including the Lewiston-Clarkston valley, where a planned utopian community called Vineland was established.


Categories: Agriculture, Washington state history
Tags: Apples, Utopias, Orchards


The Essential Egg
Spring 2013

More than a century ago, Washington State College's chicken farming course helped Judson Wilcox and others start up what would become Washington's 1.9 billion-egg-a-year industry.


Categories: WSU Extension, Food, Agriculture
Tags: Puyallup, Chickens, Poultry, Eggs


A place of taste
Winter 2012

The local food scene is evolving and growing in Jefferson County on Washington's Olympic Peninsula.


Categories: Food, Agriculture
Tags: Organic foods, Local food


Summer Blues
Fall 2012

Glenn Aldrich ’58, ’62 carries on a family tradition of growing blueberries in Lewis County. The blueberry's popularity due to its healthy properties has helped production triple in Washington in recent years.


Categories: Agriculture, Food
Tags: Blueberries


Cherries in two dimensions
Fall 2012

A novel architecture for cherry trees on a two-dimensional plane can help the trees develop a fruiting wall suited for mechanized harvesters. WSU horticulturist Matthew Whiting '01 PhD is part of a project to develop the  upright fruiting offshoots (UFOs) system.


Categories: WSU Extension, Agriculture
Tags: Cherries, Horticulture


Raspberries
Summer 2012
The cultivation of raspberries is, compared to that of other fruits, a relatively recent endeavor. Rubus idaeus, “the bramble bush of Ida,” purportedly grew on the slopes of Mount Ida and was enjoyed by the residents of the city of Troy. Ida,...
Categories: Food, Agriculture
Tags: Breeding, Horticulture, Raspberries


Dan Newhouse ’77—Farm to director’s office
Summer 2012
In 2009, Dan Newhouse ’77 was walking through the wings of the state House of Representatives when the governor’s chief of staff approached him with a surprising offer.Newhouse was a four-term Republican representative from Sunnyside and fl...
Categories: Agriculture, Alumni, Public affairs
Tags: Politicians, Hops, State government


A blighted Northwest icon
Spring 2012
Last March, Gary Chastagner was driving around southwest Oregon scouting test plots for a study of madrone, the gnarly, reddish-brown tree found up and down the West Coast. A variety of diseases had been hitting the trees in recent year...
Categories: Agriculture, Botany
Tags: Madrone, Trees, Diseases


Mulch ado about garden plastics
Spring 2012
In 2001, Carol Miles certified WSU’s first piece of organic land, a three-acre parcel at the WSU Vancouver Research and Extension Unit. It was a landmark moment, leading the way for organicall...
Categories: Agriculture, Environmental studies
Tags: Gardening, Sustainability, Organic foods


A Cattle Drive
Spring 2012
Penn Cove may be known for its mussels, but just across the Whidbey Island bay from Coupeville is another operation—the Muzzall family farm, known to local grass-fed beef fans as the Three Sisters Cattle...
Categories:
Food, Agriculture
Tags: Farmers, Beef, Cattle

A Feast of Good Things
Spring 2012

How do we Washingtonians eat? The author travels from farm to table to explore and explain Washington cuisine.


Categories: Food, Agriculture, Culinary Arts
Tags: Cuisine, Northwest history, Restaurants, Farmers, Farmers markets


Wheat: A 10,000-year relationship
Winter 2011
A while back, George DePasquale visited the ancient Italian city of Pompeii, not far from his ancestral home of Sorrento. Looking at a 2,000-year-old oven, DePasquale could easily imagine how its baker prepared and baked bread much as he does toda...
Categories: Agriculture, Food
Tags: Bread, Baking, Wheat


The lost and found flourmill
Winter 2011
Steve Fulton grew up in the 1960s with his uncle Leonard’s flour milled with a process called Unifine. Fulton ate whole wheat bread baked by his mother Lee x’38 from the flour. His father Joseph x’39 promoted and delivered the flour...
Categories: WSU history, Business, Agriculture
Tags: Milling, Flour, Unifine


A Fine Thin Skin—wind, water, volcanoes, and ice
Fall 2011
Different as they seem, the soils of Eastern and Western Washington have one thing in common. They come—either by water, wind, or ice—generally from elsewhere. And what takes eons to form can be covered over or erode away in a geologic heartbeat.
Categories: Agriculture, Earth sciences
Tags: Geology, Soil, Agronomy


Billions Served
Fall 2011

Seven billion people will soon become nine billion before the global population levels off. Can so many people be fed from a finite Earth? Yes, they can, say WSU researchers. But the solutions will necessarily be many.


Categories: Social work, Food, Agriculture
Tags: Population, Hunger, Wheat, International development


Wendell Berry comes to Washington
Fall 2011
Poet and author Wendell Berry visited Skagit Valley in May at the invitation of Washington State University students and faculty. He spent the day touring the WSU research and extension center and exploring a farm. He also visited with area farmers...
Categories: Literature, Agriculture
Tags: Writers


Westward Ho!
Fall 2011
There was a time, not so long ago, in our great Northwest when boundaries were not a great concern. When the first non-Indian settlers reached the Palouse and the Columbia Plateau, they could look to the distant horizon and see nothing bu...
Categories: Agriculture, Earth sciences
Tags: Soil, Farmers


Business is blooming
Summer 2011
On a sunny weekend in early spring, 40 farmers and would-be cut flower growers fill the second floor of the barn at Jello Mold Farm in the Skagit Valley. Bundled in their coats against the cool mo...
Categories: Business, Agriculture, WSU Extension
Tags: Flowers, Gardens


Carrots
Summer 2011
Although a wine and carrot pairing is not immediately obvious, it is intriguing that carrots and wine grapes appreciate the same environmental conditions. In fact, Horse Heaven Hills, Washington’s newest viticultural region, is also hom...
Categories: Food, Agriculture
Tags: Recipe, Carrots


Chickpeas
Winter 2010
Although Middle Eastern cooks who found themselves in the United States undoubtedly found sources of such a vital ingredient, it wasn’t until the last couple of decades that the chickpea made its way into the American diet and moved up from t...
Categories: Food, Agriculture
Tags: Chickpeas, Garbanzo beans, Hummus


Back to the city
Fall 2010

As King County's farm specialist, Steve Evans '78, '82 has watched agriculture disappear from the area. But now some of the land is going to smaller farms with high value crops. Meanwhile, small farms agent Bee Cha helps East African refugees farm in the urban Pacific Northwest.


Categories: Agriculture, WSU Extension
Tags: Seattle, Urban farming, Tacoma, Extension, Farmers markets


Cultivating new energy
Fall 2010
With just a whiff of irony, let’s sing a song of praise for gasoline.A single gallon contains more than 30,000 calories. You wouldn’t want to drink it, but in straight-up energy terms, that’s enough to power a human for about two weeks.Gaso...
Categories: Chemistry, Engineering, Agriculture
Tags: Sustainability, Algae, Methane, Fuels, Biofuels


The kinder, gentler orchard
Fall 2010

The Food Quality Protection Act of 1996 initiated the gradual phasing out of organophosphate pesticides. By 2012, the major chemical defense against wormy apples will no longer be available. But not to worry, thanks to a continuous refinement of Integrated Pest Management and collaboration amongst growers, industry fieldmen, and WSU researchers.


Categories: WSU Extension, Agriculture
Tags: Tree fruit, Integrated Pest Management, Fruit, Pesticides, Pest management, Horticulture


Cows deposit piles of diversity
Fall 2010
Holly Ferguson knows her cow pies about as well as anyone. In the first study of flies in managed pastures in the Pacific Northwest, the entomologist has spent an unusual amount of time traveling the state and assessing its cow pies.No matter ...
Categories: Biological sciences, Agriculture
Tags: Cattle, Entomology, Manure, Dung


Too much of a good thing
Fall 2010
Science has been predicting and measuring our warming planet for more than a century now. But it was only in the last two decades that most Americans came to believe the earth’s temperature was indeed rising and that the main culprit is the...
Categories: Biological sciences, Agriculture, Environmental studies
Tags: Nitrogen, Greenhouse gases, Nitrate fertilizer, Climate change


Tree Top: Creating a fruit revolution
Fall 2010
Book reviewIn the September 10, 1951, issue of Life magazine is a picture of a bulldozer mounding apples in the Yakima dump. Seven acres of apples worth $6 million dollars rotted as pigs rooted through them, the result of failing foreign mark...
Categories: Business, Agriculture
Tags: Tree Top, Apples, Northwest history, Books


The meat of the matter
Fall 2010
Dan Snyder can remember when local grocery stores would only buy one case of Cougar Brand Smokies at a time. Now, it’s unusual for them to buy fewer than three or four. And when they run out, the Washington State University Meats Lab manage...
Categories: Food, Agriculture
Tags: Meats, Cougar Smokies sausage


The Cultivated Landscape
Fall 2010
One place you must add to your “must-visit-before-I-die” list is the Wenatchee Valley during full bloom of the pear and apple orchards in late April. Perhaps you’ve seen Van Gogh’s lovely, but not often reproduced, painting “The Pin...
Categories: Washington state history, Agriculture
Tags: Landscape, Pastoral


Walla Walla Sweets
Fall 2010
When retired French soldier Pete Pieri settled in Walla Walla around the turn of the 20th century, he planted onion seed he had brought from Corsica. His new neighbors, Italian gardeners who had settled there earlier, admired the ability of the...
Categories: Agriculture, Food
Tags: Walla Walla Sweets, Onions


Big Ideas
Summer 2010
We delve into WSU's rich intellectual history, listing some of the great ideas and discoveries that have come out of our institution.
Categories: WSU history, WSU faculty, Agriculture, Biological sciences, Social sciences
Tags: Research, Science history, Innovation, Scientists


Interview with Michael Pollan
Summer 2010
Michael Pollan has been a leading voice in the re-evaluation of how we eat and farm. The author of Omnivore’s Dilemma, the book selected for this year’s Common Reading, Pollan visited campus in January to talk with the students who had be...
Categories: Agriculture, Environmental studies
Tags: Organic foods, Food


The best berries
Summer 2010
These are not your ordinary grocery store strawberries. They are nothing like those California berries, bred for size, long truck rides, and shelf-life, locked in plastic clamshells under the florescent lights of the produce section,. The berries...
Categories: Agriculture, Food
Tags: Skagit Valley, Strawberry, Strawberries, Fruit


The Secret Death of Bees
Spring 2010
WSU lab probes mysterious decline in honey bee population.
Categories: Agriculture, Biological sciences
Tags: Bees, Colony Collapse Disorder, Honey


Skagit Valley studies
Spring 2010
One student has been wading into Padilla Bay to look at eelgrass, another hikes into spinach fields to see if lime can protect the plant from fusarium wilt, and a third is studying the dynamics of conflict among farmers, landowners, environme...
Categories: WSU students, Agriculture
Tags: Research


Finally, a Washington apple
Spring 2010
A Washington apple? you say. You might respond, correctly, that Washington and apples are almost synonymous. After all, we produce more than half of the nation’s eating apples. Visit a market in Mexico, Thailand, Houston, or Saudi Arabia, and...
Categories: Agriculture, Food
Tags: Horticulture, Apples


Brian Carter ’06—On the same garden path
Spring 2010
Brian Carter ’06 is a natural resource specialist with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, but he often uses a shorter description.“I’m a curator,” he says, while offering up the Latin name for a tree at Seattle’s Ballard Locks. “I m...
Categories: Alumni, Global Campus, Agriculture
Tags: Gardening, Parks


Is organic more nutritious?
Winter 2009
This summer saw the publication of a study of the nutritional value of organic versus conventional foods by scientists with the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. Based on a review of 55 articles they judged of satisfactory quality, t...
Categories: Agriculture, Food
Tags: Organic foods, Nutrition


Cultivated thought
Winter 2009
Cultivated thought : : Near the end of an otherwise lackluster speech to the Wisconsin State Agricultural Society in September 1859, Abraham Lincoln suddenly shifted gears heading into his peroration.Having compared two conflicting theories of lab...
Categories: Agriculture, Food
Tags: Nutrition


Master Gardeners
Fall 2009
"Cultivating plants, people, and communities since 1973" is how the Master Gardeners explain themselves. The concept has worked well. Washington, where it all started, now has over 3,000 volunteer Master Gardeners, who in exchange for training in turn give their knowledge and expertise to others in their communities. These communities have now spread across the United States and Canada.
Categories: WSU Extension, Agriculture
Tags: Gardens, Gardening


Foiling an invasive
Fall 2009
Sometimes, figuring something out only deepens the overall mystery.Take Pseudomonas fluorescens D7, for example.Ann Kennedy, a USDA-Agricultural Research Service soil microbiologist at Washington S...
Categories: Agriculture, Biological sciences
Tags: Cheatgrass, Invasive weeds


Spring is the season for chèvre
Summer 2009
After a winter’s break, the goats at Rhonda Gothberg’s farm have kidded and their milk is rich and sweet. The soft French-style cheese she makes is delicious with just a nuance of that goat tang. Maybe it’s because the animals have added ten...
Categories: Agriculture, Food
Tags: Goats, Cheese


The Love Letters
Spring 2009
In 1907, Othello had no high school, so Xerpha Mae McCulloch '30 traveled 50 miles to Ritzville to finish school. There she met, and fell in love with, Edward Gaines, a few years her senior. The recent gift to Washington State University of her steamer trunk reveals the life of a woman whose story is not only threaded through the University's, but also through the story of agriculture in Washington State.
Categories: Memoirs, WSU history, Agriculture
Tags: WSU staff, Xerpha Gaines, Botany


Hunger for justice
Spring 2009
On November 5, an overflow crowd in the CUB Senior Ballroom heard some hard truths about the global food crisis. Dr. Vandana Shiva, founder of several organizations that promote agricultural diversification in India, described how corporate/governme...
Categories: Social work, Agriculture
Tags: Social justice


Rethinking the Fundamentals
Winter 2008
Feeding the world may require us to use old knowledge in new ways. Although the prices of fuel and commodities have dropped since early summer, the volatility of their relationship will surely dog us for the foreseeable future. While stock prices may temporarily overshadow food prices in the public consciousness, some farmers and researchers are looking at different ways of doing business, perhaps moving the land-grant university back to its founding purpose.
Categories: Food, Agriculture
Tags: Biofuels, Food costs


L'Américain en Provence
Winter 2008
A story about an expatriate—and about his wine. Provence is a world away from Bellevue, where Denis Gayte '97 grew up. And French winemaking is another world away from the public relations career he abandoned. So there he was, with his French heritage and a newly minted "young French winemaker" degree—but still referred to (and always affectionately) as l'Américain.
Categories: Agriculture, Alumni
Tags: Wine, France, Provence


Ferdinand's turns 60
Winter 2008
This brief item appeared on the front page of the Daily Evergreen on Monday, October 11, 1948:   Dairy Dept. to Open Counter in Troy Hall The department of dairy husbandry will start operating a dairy counter serving ice cream, plain and choc...
Categories: Agriculture, WSU history
Tags: Dairy, Ferdinand's


An Afghanistan success story
Winter 2008
The people of Laghman province in eastern Afghanistan suffered through a severe drought from 1997 through 2001. On top of years of conflict, the drought took an enormous toll on its people. Farmers sold off their cattle as the drought worsened, un...
Categories: Agriculture, Social work
Tags: International development, Afghanistan


A Season for Seeds
Winter 2008
STRANGE THINGS sprout in Skagit Valley's fields: Monster plants with six-foot stalks covered with yellow flowers, delicate ferny-leaved things with round white heads holding hundreds of tiny blossoms, and unruly tangles of leaves, spears, and spik...
Categories: Food, Agriculture
Tags: Seeds


Seeing red (and far-red)
Fall 2008
Ask crop scientist Michael Neff about plant growth, and he won't talk about rainfall or fertilizer. He'll talk about what the plants see."What I've been interested in forever is how plants use light as a source of information," says Neff. "Plants ...
Categories: Biological sciences, Agriculture
Tags: Plant behavior, Infrared


BJ Duft - Of meals and missions
Fall 2008
At age 24, BJ Duft found himself in Bill Marriott's private jet face-to-face with the CEO of Marriott International. They were headed back to Washington D.C. from Penn State University where Duft '86 had gone to do some on-campus recruitin...
Categories: Alumni, Agriculture
Tags: Restaurants, Organic foods


Dahlias
Summer 2008
When Dan Pearson was eight years old, his father brought a batch of brown tubers home and planted them in the yard. Intrigued, Dan helped tend the vigorous plants that sprang from them and watched them bloom into flashy, brightly hued flowers, som...
Categories: Agriculture
Tags: Flowers, Dahlias


Hops & beer
Summer 2007

Raising the raw ingredients for beer can be just as complex and interesting as growing grapes for wine, says Jason Perrault '97, '01. Like grapes, hops have different varieties and characteristics. Perrault, fourth-generation heir to a hops-farming legacy, runs a hops breeding program for Yakima Valley growers, helping to ensure that Washington continues to provide three-quarters of the hops grown in this country.


Categories: Business, Agriculture
Tags: Hops, Beer


A lavender landscape
Summer 2007
The landscape west of Sequim has, no doubt, always been beautiful. There's an obvious advantage to having the foothills of the Olympics on the near horizon. But add fields of lavender, and you have jaw-drop stunning.Beauty is obviously a constant ...
Categories: Agriculture, Alumni, Business
Tags: Agritourism, Lavender


A week in Malawi
Spring 2007

In a country wracked with poverty, AIDS, and overpopulation, WSU's president finds vitality and hope.


Categories: Agriculture, Social work
Tags: Africa, Malawi


Spillman memorial rededicated
Spring 2007
A memorial marker for William Jasper Spillman, a crop research pioneer and one of Washington State College's first professors, was returned to campus last fall.Spillman was the sixth faculty member to be hired at WSC, and the researcher responsibl...
Categories: WSU faculty, Agriculture
Tags: Memorials


Whither organic?
Winter 2006
With a new organic major and a strong history of research, WSU is a leader in organic agriculture. But is that enough to keep up with the demands of a burgeoning organic industry?
Categories: Agriculture
Tags: Sustainability, Organic foods


Establishing a solid foundation
Fall 2006

A laboratory and vineyard in Prosser are where your wine is supposed to begin.


Categories: Agriculture
Tags: Wine


Building a better treadle pump—one step at a time
Fall 2006
The first thing Jeff Evans, a recent graduate in entrepreneurship, did when he started his senior project was to locate Malawi on a map.He and engineering students Travis Meyer, Kyle Kraemer, and Dan Good have since learned a lot about this Africa...
Categories: Agriculture, Engineering
Tags: Irrigation, Malawi


Cherries—The sweet fruit of worry
Summer 2006
In March, Don Olmstead Jr. ('70 Hort.) watches over his cherry trees night and day, ready to activate a heating system or switch on the wind machines to protect the tender buds from a killing frost. It's a task he shares with his son and business ...
Categories: Agriculture, Food
Tags: Horticulture, Cherries


No shrinking violet
Summer 2006
Researchers at WSU are finding that plants are surprisingly assertive. Based on their findings, a case could be made that the average potted plant is at least as active as the average human couch potato—and a lot smarter about what it consumes
Categories: Agriculture, Biological sciences, Botany, Alumni
Tags: Photosynthesis, Plant behavior, Pest management


Uncommon access: Gaylord Mink shifts his focus from viruses to wild horses
Summer 2006
Gaylord Mink, hunched over and quiet as a mule deer, picks his way through rugged rangeland near the center of the Yakama Indian Reservation.Mink stops, straightens, and scans toward Dry Creek Elbow in the distance. Much closer, five wild horses l...
Categories: Biological sciences, Environmental studies, Agriculture
Tags: Animal health, Animal behavior, Horses, Plant behavior


Cool,Soothing,Lucrative Mint
Spring 2006
If you drive through Central Washington's mint-growing country in mid-summer, you're likely to be overwhelmed by the scent of mint rising like an exhalation—at once delightful and inescapable—from the surrounding fields. In fact, your senses m...
Categories: Agriculture, Area studies
Tags: Genetically modified foods, Food


Eat more garlic
Spring 2006
If there's just one thing you plant in your garden, make it garlic.For one thing, it's extraordinarily easy to grow. Plant it around Columbus Day. Cover it with mulch. Or don't. Water it now and then when it starts growing again in the spring. And...
Categories: Health sciences, Food, Agriculture
Tags: Gardening, Garlic, 4-H


Farming in the rain
Spring 2006
Farming in the Skokomish River Valley can be a challenge, what with 60 to 80 inches of rain a year. One year, Hunter Farms's pumpkin fields flooded, the pumpkins bobbing like buoys on a temporary sea. Fortunately, the river receded in time for fam...
Categories: Alumni, Agriculture
Tags: Farmers


Washington's wine crush
Winter 2005
From Whidbey Island to Woodinville to Walla Walla, Washington's wine industry is coming of age.
Categories: Agriculture, Food
Tags: Wine tasting, Wine, Grapes


The spice of life: Apples come in more than one variety
Fall 2005
Apples come in more than one variety—a lot more.
Categories: Food, Agriculture
Tags: Apples, Horticulture


Bounty on the bluff
Fall 2005
The small farming community of Green Bluff lies nestled in the foothills of Mt. Spokane. Its bucolic setting belies the fact that it's just 15 miles north of Spokane. Take a meandering drive around "the Bluff," and you'll pass by dozens of family ...
Categories: Agriculture
Tags: Farmers, Tourism


In Search of the Wild Chickpea
Summer 2005

About an hour into our continued search, Walt called out that he had found it. It was on a slope so steep and rocky, we had to lie on our sides to keep from sliding down. But that was the good news, because the plant was apparently thriving in a niche where competing plants could not survive.


Categories: Botany, Agriculture
Tags: Seeds, Chickpea, Republic of Georgia


Asparagus
Summer 2005
Toppenish-area farmer Kevin Bouchey has an affinity for asparagus, which his family has been growing since 1979. "It's a funny crop," says Bouchey, who also farms wheat and potatoes. "In a given farm year, you usually grow a plant and then harvest...
Categories: Agriculture
Tags: Asparagus, Farmers


The Tie That Binds
Spring 2005
No matter what you want to blame--predatory pricing, vertical integration, foreign competition, globalization, urban sprawl--the fact of the matter is, rural America is packing it in. At least the rural America of our memory or imagination.
Categories: Agriculture, Economics
Tags: Farmers, Food


Thomas hits paydirt with composting advice
Spring 2005
Tamara Thomas is not afraid to get down and dirty helping clients solve earthy problems. She owns Terre-Source, a one-woman consulting firm in Mt. Vernon that specializes in composting.Her clients include North Mason Fiber Company in Belfair, area ...
Categories: Agriculture, Alumni
Tags: Compost, Soil


The Circle of Life and the Farmer's Daughters
Winter 2004
Determined that, contrary to popular assumption, bread flour could indeed be grown in the Inland Northwest, a few years ago Fred Fleming '73 and Karl Kupers '71 started growing Terra, a new variety of hard red spring wheat developed by Washington ...
Categories: Agriculture, Business
Tags: Sustainability, Wheat, Food


Livestock Advisors Celebrate 20 Years
Winter 2004
While the nationally recognized Master Gardener Program celebrated its 30th anniversary last summer, another Washington State University Extension volunteer program observed its 20th year of lending good advice.The early 1980s saw a growing a back...
Categories: WSU faculty, Agriculture
Tags: Livestock


Field-burning study proves inconclusive
Fall 2004
The study found no significant health effect from field burning--nor did it explain why.
Categories: Agriculture, Health sciences
Tags: Palouse, Smoke


A library of rhizobial genes
Fall 2004
Kahn and his team have nearly completed a monumental step in understanding nitrogen fixation.
Categories: Agriculture, Biological sciences
Tags: Nitrogen, Genetics, Bacteria


Cougar in the corn
Fall 2004
Philipp Schmitt fashioned this elaborate Cougar Country corn maze on 14 acres east of Spokane near Liberty Lake last October. Each fall for the past five years, he's used global positioning-coordinates beamed by satellite-to figure out where to p...
Categories: Agriculture
Tags: Design, Cougar pride


McDonald at home on the range
Fall 2004
At 77, Esther Johnson McDonald is still active in the day-to-day operation of the 9,000-acre Triangle Ranch in Philipsburg, Montana, with her husband of 51 years, John W. "Pat" McDonald. The two met at a bull sale in Missoula. Her mother operated ...
Categories: Agriculture, Alumni
Tags: Cattle, Ranching


Full Circle
Summer 2004
Steve Jones and Tim Murray want to make the immense area of eastern Washington, or at least a good chunk of it, less prone to blow, less often bare, even more unchanging. The way they'll do this is to convince a plant that is content to die after it sets seed in late summer that it actually wants to live.
Categories: Agriculture
Tags: Wheat, Palouse, Genetics


A bug-eat-bug world
Winter 2003

If you can put other insects to work eating the insects that are bothering you, everybody wins. Except the pests.


Categories: Agriculture, Biological sciences
Tags: Entomology, Pest management


Low prices bog down cranberry growers
Winter 2003
In the not-so-old days, circa the mid-1990s, a small farmer along Washington's southern coastline could rake enough cranberries—and money—from just 10 acres of bogs to send the kids to college and maybe have enough cash left to spend Christmas...
Categories: Food, Agriculture
Tags: Cranberries, Recipe


Pacific Northwest sagebrush steppe
Winter 2003
Though it is the most widespread of plant ecosystems in eastern Washington, covering 24,000 square miles, the sagebrush-steppe is probably the least understood, and therefore the least appreciated, especially among gardeners. By nature, gardeners ...
Categories: Botany, Agriculture
Tags: Sagebrush steppe, Gardening, Eastern Washington


A place at the table
Fall 2003
American farmers claim less than 10 percent of what we spend on food. A growing number are going after their fair share--and we consumers stand to benefit.
Categories: Agriculture
Tags: Food


The benefits of mustard
Fall 2003
Remember your first encounter with classic Chinese mustard? Your seared sinuses? Your cheeks washed with involuntary tears?What you tasted was the indelicate reaction of the mustard plant's chemical compounds, probably enhanced by the wetness of y...
Categories: Biological sciences, Agriculture
Tags: Potatoes, Biochemistry


Happy cows, contented ranchers
Fall 2003
Joel Huesby sees himself as conducting a harmonious symphony of life that includes soil, plants, animals, and people. His steaks taste great, too.
Categories: Agriculture
Tags: Livestock, Organic foods


Homage to a difficult land: An African scientist returns home
Spring 2003
Beset by a relentless drought, the Sahel seems in unstoppable ecological decline. But Oumar Badini will not give up. There must be some way to help Mali farmers reclaim the land.
Categories: Agriculture
Tags: Africa, Mali, Scientists, Public service


Living and gardening in the Pacific Northwest - Spring 2003
Spring 2003
Some gardeners work to change conditions in their yard to create havens of greenery and blooms with plants that wouldn't grow there otherwise. They amend the soil to suit plants' needs, they water a lot during the summer, and they give added prote...
Categories: Agriculture
Tags: Gardening


Smoke & asthma
Spring 2003
For as long as Jami Hinshaw can remember, she has coughed, sneezed, sniffled, and felt miserable every September. When she was nine, the Spokane native and WSU alum was diagnosed with asthma.Last fall, Hinshaw was fighting her usual symptoms, but ...
Categories: Public affairs, Agriculture, Health sciences
Tags: Air quality, Field burning, Asthma


Taking the University to the people
Winter 2002
Cooperative Extension still offers advice on how to can your tomatoes or care for your chickens. But it also does much more, probing needs and providing solutions in every corner of the state.
Categories: Agriculture
Tags: Cooperative extension, Public service


The Puyallup Fair
Winter 2002
Every year in late summer, more than a million people gather in Puyallup to eat cotton candy, endure the latest thrill rides--and watch 4-H-ers show their stuff.
Categories: Agriculture, Education
Tags: Fairs, 4-H


Designed to compete
Winter 2002
By developing new spring wheat varieties with exceptional milling and baking characteristics, Kim Kidwell hopes to create a domestic demand for Washington wheat so it is milled and baked in the Northwest instead of being exported into increasingly...
Categories: Earth sciences, Agriculture
Tags: Soil, Wheat


A summer job that meant something
Winter 2002
An entomology undergrad combats the worm in the appleWhen they hatch, they're so tiny you can barely see them. Then they eat. They bore their way inside an apple and consume it from within. After two weeks, they're half an inch long, pinkish orange...
Categories: Agriculture, Biological sciences
Tags: Apples, Pest management, Entomology


Living and gardening in the Pacific Northwest
Winter 2002
In Washington State, it has been over 200 years since indigenous peoples described where they lived as "the place where camas blooms" or "the place where wild onions nod." In other parts of the country, it has been even longer.Where Native America...
Categories: Agriculture
Tags: Gardening


Columbia Valley wineries double
Winter 2002
Arthur Linton, center, assistant dean and director of Washington State University's Irrigated Agriculture Research and Extension Center (IAREC) in Prosser, and Julie Tarara, a USDA research horticulturist, explain the effects of temperature on gra...
Categories: Agriculture
Tags: Wine, Horticulture


Genetically modified foods—What's in it for you?
Fall 2002
If you think scientists all agree on genetically modified foods, think again.
Categories: Agriculture
Tags: Genetically modified foods, Food


Killer compost
Fall 2002
If you use compost in your garden, you may be setting yourself up for either a bumper crop or a bummer crop.Gardeners, greenhouse operators, and organic farmers from Washington to California have experienced crop failures on certain plants af...
Categories: Agriculture
Tags: Gardening


Keeping our food safe
Fall 2002
If you’re worried that our food supply might be the next target of international terrorists, you probably needn’t be, says Barbara Rasco, associate professor of food science and human nutrition. Rasco’s research centers on bioterrorism and t...
Categories: Agriculture, Health sciences
Tags: Food-borne illness, Food


Bulbs and blooms
Fall 2002
"Roozen" may mean "roses" in Dutch. But in Washington, it means tulips--to the tune of 50 million a year.
Categories: Agriculture, Business
Tags: Tulips, Flowers


Fall is the time to plant bulbs—but maybe not the ones you'd planned on
Fall 2002
Another approach to perennials is to go back to basics--native plants.
Categories: Agriculture
Tags: Flowers, Gardening


An English import invades Puget Sound
Summer 2002
A classic case of good intention gone bad, English cordgrass (Spartina anglica) was introduced to Washington around 1962 to stabilize dikes and provide forage for cattle. The U.S. Department of Agriculture imported seeds from England, and a WSU e...
Categories: Agriculture
Tags: Invasive weeds


Washington apples—best of the best
Winter 2001
ALTHOUGH DEBATE will continue over the benefits of organic versus conventional farming, Washington State University scientists have established that organic production of apples is more sustainable than conventional apple production. Soil sc...
Categories: Agriculture
Tags: Apples


Cataclysm, Light & Passion
Winter 2001
Even though the Washington wine industry is in its relative infancy, it is playing with the big boys. How did it get so good so quickly?
Categories: Agriculture
Tags: Wine