Washington State Magazine
Search Results

Author: Hannelore Sudermann

252 article(s) found by this author.

At Home at School
Summer 2015
Even though they are out of school, homeless and impoverished children in southwest Washington receive high-quality summer educational experiences, thanks to a WSU Vancouver program.
Categories: Education
Tags: Homelessness, Poverty

Seeing Selma
Summer 2015
In March 1965 WSU photographer James H. Barker and others from WSU joined and documented the march to Selma in support of voting rights for African Americans.
Categories: History
Tags: Selma, Civil rights, African Americans, Voting

First Words
Spring 2015
Washington Irving, Frances Fuller Victor, and other east coast writers described the American West and created a mythology that did not reflect reality or fact.
Categories: History
Tags: American West, Washington Irving

Bringing up babies
Spring 2015
Writer and editor Tracy Cutchlow '97 leveraged her personal and professional experience to help new parents with raising children.
Categories: Psychology
Tags: Brain, Babies, Child development

Winter Greens—Beyond the kale
Spring 2015
Kale's growing popularity leads to a look into a whole world of winter greens, such as Salanova and chicory.
Categories: Agriculture, Food
Tags: Salanova, Winter greens, Kale

A Re-dress of the West
Spring 2015
Stripping away the mythology of the American West exposes a more diverse, more interesting history.
Categories: Architecture and design, History, Cultural studies
Tags: Chinatown, Photographers, American West, Gender

Review :: The Slow Regard of Silent Things
Spring 2015
A darling of the sci-fi/fantasy set, Pat Rothfuss has diverted from the long-awaited third part of his bestselling Kingkiller trilogy and, instead, taken the time to explore the story of lovely, lonely Auri, one of the secondary Kingkiller char...
Categories: Fiction
Tags: Fantasy

Finding the artist: An absurd, incredible journey
Winter 2014
We trace the history of Harold Balazs ’51, one of the most prolific public artists in the Northwest. Settling in Washington, he has made our corner of the universe a nicer place to be.
Categories: Alumni, Fine Arts
Tags: Artists, Public art

Art in public places
Winter 2014
Washington state's Art in Public Places program enhanced WSU and state buildings since 1974.
Categories: Fine Arts
Tags: Public art, Buildings

Seeing and Knowing
Winter 2014
There is still much to see and to know for all of us, as the stories in this issue take new looks at art, maps, and the natural world.
Categories: Fine Arts, Washington State Magazine
Tags: Observation, Artists, Climate change

Lost writer from a lost time
Winter 2014
A WSU professor and a Northwest novelist are bringing writer of the working class Robert Cantwell, a Washington native, and his most significant book, Land of Plenty, out of the mists of time.
Categories: History, Literature
Tags: Labor and unions, Writers, Northwest history

The roots of tilth
Winter 2014
Sustainable agriculture took a step forward when a group of Washington farmers, gardeners, and concerned citizens formed the nation's first organized efforts with Washington Tilth.
Categories: Agriculture
Tags: Organic foods, Sustainability, Tilth, Sustainable agriculture

Holiday Sparklers and Caviar
Winter 2014
Sparkling wine and caviar add zest to the holidays. Washington is now home to some fine sparklers, while WSU researchers work on sustainable caviar.
Categories: Food
Tags: Caviar, Sparkling wine

Jaclyn Phillips ’10—Tripping the towers
Fall 2014
Engineer Jaclyn Phillips ’10 volunteers to build a bridge in Nicaragua.
Categories: Alumni, Engineering
Tags: Bridges, Nicaragua, Philanthropy

Pam Nolan-Beasley ’88—Physics for five-year-olds
Fall 2014
Pam Nolan-Beasley ’88, a kindergarten teacher at Waitsburg Elementary School, says kids at that age are sponges for science education.
Categories: Alumni, Education
Tags: Kindergarten, Science education

Review :: Island Queens and Mission Wives: How Gender and Empire Remade Hawai‘i’s Pacific World
Fall 2014
When white missionaries landed on the sunlit shores of Hawai‘i in the early nineteenth century, they believed they were bringing God, culture, and civilization. They failed to realize that instead they were pulled into a sophisticated and lon...
Categories: History
Tags: Hawaii, Missionaries

For the Health of a City
Fall 2014
In just two decades, an ailing industrial area has been transformed into a vibrant campus for health education. Now WSU Spokane is primed to train more doctors and other medical professionals to meet growing demands for health care.
Categories: WSU Spokane, Health sciences
Tags: Medical school, Urban renewal

First Words for Fall 2014
Fall 2014
Subtle ties between stories are revealed in the issue, from garbage to art to health sciences to food.
Categories: Fine Arts, Health sciences, Sociology
Tags: Garbage, Food

The Brussels sprout
Fall 2014
The finicky and demanding Brussels sprout requires care and attention, but appeals to cooks who steam, fry, roast, or braise them.
Categories: Food
Tags: Brussels sprouts

The ultimate DIY source
Fall 2014
The land-grant school has been advising Washingtonians on topics from canning jams to breeding cattle since 1892, often through Extension bulletins.
Categories: WSU Extension, WSU history
Tags: Extension, Bulletins

Summer Spikes
Summer 2014
A team on the court and in the camps, this summer WSU’s volleyball student athletes will coach the next generation of college players.
Categories: Athletics
Tags: Volleyball, Camps

The time in between
Summer 2014
Prolific essayist Michel de Montaigne was introduced to England by translator John Florio, a journey of readers and literature traced by WSU English professor Will Hamlin.
Categories: English, History
Tags: Montaigne, England

Tom Norwalk ’75—Visit Seattle
Summer 2014
Tom Norwalk, president and CEO of Visit Seattle, talks about tourism in Seattle and the state of Washington.
Categories: Business, Alumni
Tags: Tourism, Seattle

Allison Helfen ’89—A crush on local wine
Summer 2014
The Wine Alley in Renton was a dream come real for Allison Helfen and her husband Scott.
Categories: Alumni, Business
Tags: Wine

State of Wonder
Summer 2014
A childhood spent in Washington has never been better. Our abundant natural resources, our trove of teachers and volunteers, and our commitment to child development make this a great state to grow up in.
Categories: Washington state history, Education
Tags: Outdoors, Child development, Children

Review :: Hunger Immortal: The First Thirty Years of the West Seattle Food Bank, 1983–2013
Summer 2014
What is today the West Seattle Food Bank started as a shoestring operation in an abandoned public school building. A pair of retired grocers from South Dakota had taken on responsibility for distributing government commodities like cheese and p...
Categories: Social work, History
Tags: Food security, Seattle

First Words for Summer 2014
Summer 2014
Washington state is a wonderful place to grow up and be a kid. Hannelore Sudermann reflects on the summer issue and her own Washington childhood.
Categories: Washington state history, Education, Washington State Magazine
Tags: Children

Web Extra :: A storybook story
Summer 2014
For nearly 40 years Inga Kromann taught literature to teachers in training at WSU’s College of Education. In fact, she led the charge in expanding the children’s book offerings from “a two foot shelf in Holland Library” of “50 shabby, outd...
Categories: Children's books, Education
Tags: Children, Writers

Backyard boarders
Spring 2014
Last fall 10 Washington State University architecture students wandered into Seattle-area backyards to work on the idea of backyard cottages as transitional housing for the homeless.
Categories: Architecture and design
Tags: Homelessness, Housing

After the games
Spring 2014
Former Cougar football player Derek Sparks made a special effort to reconnect athletes whose names were once synonymous with WSU, and brought many of them back to campus for a reunion.
Categories: Athletics
Tags: Football

What about buckwheat?
Spring 2014
Washington state leads the nation in producing buckwheat, the nutritious and nutty-tasting main ingredient of soba and other foods. WSU researchers are studying this oft-overlooked crop. 
Categories: Food
Tags: Cooking, Soba, Buckwheat

A Dose of Reason—Pediatric specialists advocate for vaccines
Spring 2014
In 2011, Washington’s vaccination rate was dangerously low. According to the CDC, 6.2 percent of children in kindergarten had not been fully immunized.
Categories: Health sciences
Tags: Pediatrics, Pediatric nursing, HPV, Vaccines, Vaccination

An inquiring mind
Spring 2014
Ken Alexander ’82 is chief of pediatric infectious diseases at the University of Chicago’s Comer Children’s Hospital.
Categories: Alumni, Health sciences
Tags: Pediatrics, Doctors

Cougar encampments
Winter 2013
Over the past 20 years a community of devoted campers has developed in the parking lots around the WSU Pullman campus.
Categories: Athletics, Alumni
Tags: Tailgating, Transportation

Helen Szablya ’76—Living in interesting times
Winter 2013
Helen Szablya remembers the bombs in Budapest in World War II, and her escape from Hungary after the Communist takeover. She became an advocate for the country when she came to the United States.
Categories: Alumni, History
Tags: Hungary, World War II

Second Acts
Winter 2013
Retired librarian Bunny Levine moved to LA to follow her dream of being in the movies. She and others have found that redefining retirement can lead to greater health and happiness.
Categories: Alumni, Business, Performing arts
Tags: Retirement, Second careers

History develops, art stands still: An art historian journeys into the Renaissance
Winter 2013
The Tornabuoni family of Renaissance Florence, Italy, were patrons of the arts and, as WSU art historian Maria Deprano explains, appeared in many pieces.
Categories: Fine Arts, History
Tags: Renaissance, Italy, Florence, Art history

Watching the sea
Winter 2013
WSU Extension and its partners at the Northwest Indian College launched the Salish Sea Research Center in northwestern Washington to look at complicated environments of the region.
Categories: WSU Extension, Environmental studies
Tags: Salish Sea

Web Extra :: Recipes: Sweet corn
Fall 2013
This season sweet corn recipes abound. We at the magazine have a few favorites that we turn to every summer and we thought we’d share them with you. Sweet Corn relish Light, sweet, spicy and fresh, this tomato-free salsa is a great way to highl...
Categories: Food
Tags: Recipe, Corn

Review :: Oceania and the Victorian Imagination: Where All Things Are Possible
Fall 2013
Devotees of Victorian-era writers like Robert Louis Stevenson, Jules Verne, H.G. Wells, and Joseph Conrad may well recognize the current of interest in Oceania, or the South Pacific, that runs through their stories. During that period, from th...
Categories: Literature, History
Tags: Travel, Victorian Era, Oceania

Jennifer Merschdorf ’96—A young survivor
Fall 2013
Jennifer Merschdorf '96, a young cancer survivor, helps fellow survivors as CEO of the nonprofit Young Survival Coalition.
Categories: Alumni, Social work
Tags: Cancer, Philanthropy

A fitting business
Fall 2013
Lucy Stevenson opened her hat and dressmaking business in the late nineteenth century at the age of 60. Her work and life was exhibited at WSU in spring 2013.
Categories: Architecture and design, History
Tags: Apparel design, Women in business, Exhibit

Constant Coffee
Fall 2013
If there’s a liquid for which Olympia is more known than rain, it’s coffee. Larry Challain '73 and his coffee roasting company Batdorf & Bronson has been a constant presence in the city since the 1980s.
Categories: Alumni, Business
Tags: Coffee, Olympia

Kathleen McChesney ’71—Agent of change
Fall 2013
Kathleen McChesney '71 rose up from the King County Sheriff's department investigating Ted Bundy to the third highest position in the FBI.
Categories: Alumni, Social sciences
Tags: Criminal justice, Police, FBI

Booze, Sex, and Reality Check
Fall 2013
Student drinking may always be with us, but behavior modification could make it less risky.
Categories: Education, Campus life, Psychology
Tags: Prevention science, Sexual assault prevention, Sexual health, Alcoholism, Alcohol

A Cougar trade show
Fall 2013
The CougsFirst! trade show brought together WSU alumni, Coug celebrities, and 40 Coug-owned businesses.
Categories: Business, Alumni
Tags: Exhibit, Trade

Washington’s Sweet Corn Secret
Fall 2013
Washington is surprisingly one of the largest sweet corn producers in the United States. With irrigation, corn fits in nicely with the crop rotation in central Washington.
Categories: Food, Agriculture
Tags: Corn

Gun Show Nation—a conversation with Joan Burbick
Summer 2013
Guns and gun shows are a part of American culture, and Joan Burbick, WSU emeritus English professor and author of Gun Show Nation, talks about the place of guns in the life of the United States.
Categories: History, Public affairs
Tags: Guns, American West

Web Extra :: A Night to Remember: Looking back at four decades of the Bell Hop dance
Summer 2013
The 1969 Bell Hop The 1956 Bellman of the Year By turning the women’s gym into a nightclub for an annual dance, the students in Washington State’s Sigma Iota hospitality club drew attention to the hotel and restaurant program and raised m...
Categories: Business, WSU history
Tags: Hotel management, Hospitality

Something Old Something New—A history of hospitality
Summer 2013
When Washington State College introduced its hospitality program in 1932, no one had yet imagined an airport hotel, a drive-through restaurant, a convention center, or the boom of international travel. Eighty years later, as the industry grows in new and unexpected ways, the School of Hospitality sends its graduates out to meet its evolving needs.
Categories: Business
Tags: Restaurants, Hotels, Hospitality, Hotel management

Marcia Steele Hoover ’90—Running with a mission
Summer 2013
Marcia Steele Hoover '90 promotes creativity and health as global director of the Nike Communications Center of Excellence at Nike World Headquarters in Beaverton, Oregon.
Categories: Alumni, Business
Tags: Nike, Organizational communication

Review :: We Are the Bus
Summer 2013
This small book of poetry plays on themes of reminiscence, travel, and the bliss of simple things like being a boy with a Racket Box full of fireworks. This collection of 42 poems won the 2011 X.J. Kennedy Poetry Prize. In it McKean transports...
Categories: Poetry
Tags: Basketball, Memory

Soldiering on
Summer 2013
In the two years since WSU Tri-Cities leaders pledged to become a veteran-supportive campus, the school has increased its resources to accommodate veteran students and their families. At 8 percent of the student body, a disproportionately high number of students on campus are veterans.
Categories: WSU Tri-Cities, WSU students
Tags: Veterans

Web Extra :: Video: A Century at Alderbrook Resort
Summer 2013
Celebrating a century on Hood Canal: Washington State University Hospitality alumnus Brian McGinnis ’77 talks about the history and renovation of the 100-year-old Alderbrook Resort and Spa in western Washington. Read more about McGinnis and WSU’...
Categories: Business
Tags: Video, Hotels, Hotel management

Review :: Treasure, Treason and the Tower: El Dorado and the Murder of Sir Walter Raleigh
Spring 2013
Years ago while doing research in Stockholm, Sweden, Paul Sellin, a scholar who specializes in literature and history of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, chanced upon some correspondence about Sir Walter Raleigh and gold that he m...
Categories: History
Tags: Exploration, England, South America

Web Extra :: Tribble Trouble
Spring 2013
The trouble with going through the Icons of Science Fiction at Seattle’s Experience Music Project without WSU professor emeritus Paul Brians is that you might miss some tantalizing stories behind each display. Image from Star Trek: The Original S...
Categories: Visual arts, Media
Tags: Science fiction, Experience Music Project, Television programs, Movies

Web Extra :: A Nate Taylor (’02 Fine Arts) sampler
Spring 2013
Here is a small collection of the lively illustrations Taylor has created for his friend and WSU Classmate, fantasy writer Patrick Rothfuss ’02 MA as well as some of Taylor’s other work. The first images are linked to Rothfuss’s on-line blog at...
Categories: Alumni, Visual arts
Tags: Artists, Illustrators

Web Extra :: Reading in the Genres
Spring 2013
Here’s a small selection of suggested authors and works in a variety of genres provided by Paul Brians, professor emeritus, and clinical faculty member and writer Buddy Levy, who last spring taught advanced creative writing to undergraduates. Bria...
Categories: Literature
Tags: Authors, Books, Literary genres, Reading

Spinach is suspect: A pathological mystery
Spring 2013
Seed pathologist Lindsey du Toit at WSU Mount Vernon has been sleuthing out why spinach has been suffering from wilt, and whether the problem comes from spinach seed mostly grown in northwestern Washington.
Categories: Biological sciences, Agriculture
Tags: Spinach, Plant diseases, Plant pathology

Web Extra :: Training for good eggs: Winter School at Puyallup
Spring 2013
The first winter school for farmers was held in 1916 at the Washington State College research and experiment station in Puyallup. It offered a variety of classes including veterinary medicine, plant pathology, dairying, and the most popular by far, t...
Categories: WSU Extension, Agriculture
Tags: Poultry, Eggs

Patrick Rothfuss ’02—World Builder
Spring 2013
Life’s a fantasy for best-selling author Patrick Rothfuss. He invites us into his worlds, one real and one of his own invention.
Categories: Literature, Alumni, Fiction
Tags: Fantasy, Authors, Philanthropy

The Essential Egg
Spring 2013
More than a century ago, Washington State College's chicken farming course helped Judson Wilcox and others start up what would become Washington's 1.9 billion-egg-a-year industry.
Categories: WSU Extension, Food, Agriculture
Tags: Puyallup, Chickens, Poultry, Eggs

Sick stocks
Spring 2013
Brian McTier, a WSU Vancouver-based business school faculty member, and his colleagues explored the impact of influenza on the U.S. stock market. 
Categories: Business
Tags: Stock market, Influenza, Infectious diseases

Web Extra :: Video: Twin Vista Ranch donated to WSU
Winter 2012
In October 2012, the Jefferson County community celebrated the donation of Twin Vista Ranch to Washington State University. The 26-acre site, which was a strawberry farm in the 1920s, was purchased by Lisa Painter and Jeanne Clendenon in 1972. The...
Categories: Food, Agriculture
Tags: Local food, Organic foods, Video

What I’ve Learned Since College—An interview with Ruth Bindler ’01
Winter 2012
Ruth Bindler '01, spent her life working on children's health as well as heading up the graduate programs at the WSU College of Nursing.
Categories: Alumni, Health sciences
Tags: Nursing, Obesity, Public health

The Law and the Land
Winter 2012
Indian law attorney and Colville tribal member Brian Gunn ’95 took on the challenge of his grandfather and brought home a gratifying settlement for years of federal mismanagement of Indian trust lands.
Categories: Law, Washington state history, Alumni
Tags: Indian Law, Colville Tribes, Native American leaders, Native Americans

Spirits on the rise
Winter 2012
Craft distilleries are popping up all over Washington, like Golden Distillery, Dry Fly, and Fremont Mischief, to great acclaim.
Categories: Business
Tags: Liquor, Distilleries

Review :: Alpha Phi Alpha: A Legacy of Greatness, the Demands of Transcendence
Winter 2012
Alpha Phi Alpha is the only black fraternity to be founded at an Ivy League school. Starting at Cornell in 1906, its founders were just a generation away from slavery and intent on creating an organization to foster academic scholarship, build ...
Categories: History, Cultural studies
Tags: Black fraternities, African Americans

A place of taste
Winter 2012
The local food scene is evolving and growing in Jefferson County on Washington's Olympic Peninsula.
Categories: Food, Agriculture
Tags: Organic foods, Local food

Gene Callan ’76—A dream for today and tomorrow
Fall 2012
The Maryhill Museum of Art received a major renovation that will showcase more of its amazing collection, thanks to Portland architect Gene Callan ’76.
Categories: Architecture and design, Alumni
Tags: Museums, Columbia Gorge, Art museums

Engineers in the Making
Fall 2012
At a time when Washington is a net importer of engineers, a more appreciative vocabulary could tempt a new generation of students into studying engineering.
Categories: Engineering
Tags: Engineers, Inventors, Science education

Summer Blues
Fall 2012
Glenn Aldrich ’58, ’62 carries on a family tradition of growing blueberries in Lewis County. The blueberry's popularity due to its healthy properties has helped production triple in Washington in recent years.
Categories: Agriculture, Food
Tags: Blueberries

Review :: Dove Creek
Fall 2012
While more known for her short stories, Paula Coomer takes the novel form to tell the story of Patricia Morrison, the daughter of Kentucky hill folk who leaves her hardscrabble life in Appalachia to discover a new existence in the West. After a...
Categories: Literature
Tags: Fiction, Eastern Washington

Review :: Finding the River
Fall 2012
In 1992, President George H. W. Bush signed into law the Elwha Act, which called for the removal of two hydroelectric dams from the 45-mile river that flows from Washington’s Olympic Range to the Strait of Juan de Fuca. Over the past year, th...
Categories: History, Environmental studies
Tags: Dams, Fish

Review :: Winning the West for Women: The Life of Suffragist of Emma Smith DeVoe
Summer 2012
 At a time when women’s rights and politics are dominating our national discourse, it would be good to consider our past. Emma Smith DeVoe’s story, for example, enhances our understanding of our nation’s Women’s Suffrage movement a...
Categories: History, Political science
Tags: Suffrage, Voting, Women, American West

The Murrow boys
Summer 2012
In 1913 Ethel and Roscoe Murrow moved their family from their small farm in North Carolina to the Puget Sound community of Blanchard hoping to find a better living for themselves and their three sons. The worldwide fame of their youngest, Ed...
Categories: Alumni, Washington state history
Tags: Edward R. Murrow, Skagit Valley, Family

Raising queens
Summer 2012
Few things are as mysterious and amazing as the life of the queen bee, says bee breeder Sue Cobey. Just a few days after she hatches from her cell, the queen’s fertility is optimal and she has just a brief time to mate for the rest of her fou...
Categories: Breeding, Entomology
Tags: Genetics, Honey bee, Queen bees

Scoring position: A man buys his hometown team
Summer 2012
In the 1970s, when Mikal Thomsen ’79 was a budding business student at WSU, he earned his tuition by compiling the stats for the football, basketball, and baseball teams. The job not only let him parlay an interest in numbers and sports into ...
Categories: Athletics, Business
Tags: Baseball, Tacoma

The Collectors
Summer 2012
In 1988, hundreds of rare documents from colonial Mexico disappeared from the WSU Library archives. The author and readers go on a hunt through history to explain how they came to Pullman in the first place, and describe the investigation that led to their welcome return.
Categories: Library and museum studies, WSU history
Tags: Collections, Collectors, Archives, Colonial Mexico, Crimes

Historically Yours
Summer 2012
Paul Philemon Kies, a popular professor of English, was one of the keenest collectors at Washington State College. When he wasn’t teaching, advising, or shooting photographs on campus, he was filling his office and home with rare books, autog...
Categories: WSU faculty, History
Tags: Collections, Autographs, Collections

Web Extra :: How to cook lean beef
Spring 2012
Most of us are accustomed to eating beef from cattle finished on grain. The finishing process builds up intramuscular fat and can result in tasty, fat-marbleized meat. But many of Washington’s small and medium-scale cattle ranches finish their catt...
Categories: Food
Tags: Beef, Cooking, Cattle

A Feast of Good Things
Spring 2012
How do we Washingtonians eat? The author travels from farm to table to explore and explain Washington cuisine.
Categories: Food, Agriculture, Culinary Arts
Tags: Cuisine, Northwest history, Restaurants, Farmers, Farmers markets

Web Extra :: Recipe: Swiss Chard with Garlicky Chickpeas
Spring 2012
It was hard to pick just one recipe from Tender. But given the winter season, the ingredients (chickpeas, chard, and garlic) that we’ve recently featured in our magazine, and the smart simplicity of this dish, we chose this one to share.Serves 4 to...
Categories: Food
Tags: Recipe, Chickpeas, Garlic, Garbanzo beans

Web Extra :: A delicious dilemma:
Ingredients for a photographic still life

Spring 2012
...
Categories: Food, Photography
Tags: Cuisine, Photography

A Hidden History
Spring 2012
In 1992, Frank Hirahara ’48 sent his daughter Patti to Yakima to help his elderly parents pack up their home for their move to Southern California.What had at first seemed a chore turned into a treasure hunt as Patti unearthed letters, ...
Categories: Library and museum studies, History
Tags: Photography, World War II, Internment camps, Japanese-Americans

A Cattle Drive
Spring 2012
Penn Cove may be known for its mussels, but just across the Whidbey Island bay from Coupeville is another operation—the Muzzall family farm, known to local grass-fed beef fans as the Three Sisters Cattle Company.The farm was founded in 1910...
Categories: Food, Agriculture
Tags: Farmers, Beef, Cattle

Doug Forseth ’71—Snow business
Spring 2012
Doug Forseth ’71 believes in “management by skiing around.”He is kidding, kind of, playing on the concept of the popular business book Management by Walking Around. But the senior vice president of operations for the Whistler Blackcomb Ski Reso...
Categories: Business, Alumni
Tags: Hotel management, Skiing, Resorts, Canada

John R. Gorham 1922-2011—Veterinary pathologist
Spring 2012
In the early 1940s, John Gorham ’46 DVM, MS ’47 left his family home in Sumner to attend Washington State College as an undergraduate. He found a life here, marrying fellow student Mary Ellen Martin and staying on to earn his doctor...
Categories: Veterinary medicine, WSU faculty
Tags: Animal diseases, Pathology, Animal health, In memoriam

Review :: The World’s Beaches: A Global Guide to the Science of the Shoreline
Spring 2012
It may appear to be a scholarly approach to beaches, but once you wade in to this book, you will find an entertaining and informative read. With a light touch, Pilkey and his co-authors manage to describe some heavy concepts like erosion, tsunamis,...
Categories: Earth sciences
Tags: Geology, Ocean, Beach

Bringing history and historian together
Winter 2011
Historian Douglas Brinkley recently visited Seattle to interview William D. Ruckelshaus, the founding head of the Environmental Protection Agency and advisor to a variety of Northwest clean water and community groups.Ruckelshaus first mad...
Categories: History, Public affairs
Tags: Ecology, Government, Public service

Homes for art
Winter 2011
Few of us will ever see inside the homes of some of the Pacific Northwest’s major art collectors. But this fall we get a glimpse when the Museum of Art at Washington State University hosts an exhibit of internationally-known architect...
Categories: Architecture and design, Library and museum studies
Tags: Architects, Northwest architecture, Art museums, WSU Museum of Art

All About Everett
Winter 2011
The blue-collar Snohomish County city just 25 miles north of Seattle recently asked WSU to take over the University Center where graduates of its community college can go on to complete four-year degrees in a variety of  disciplines, including engineering. Snohomish, Skagit, and Island counties have been underserved by the state's four-year programs.
Categories: Washington state history, Education
Tags: Everett, Boeing, Ports, Higher education

Jim Dunlap ’70—Tugs, tides, and time
Winter 2011
Jim Dunlap ’70 says he learned the family business “from the mud up.” Today one of several Dunlaps in the water transportation business runs a tugboat and freight company with ports in Everett and LaConner. But his first job workin...
Categories: Business, Alumni
Tags: Tugboats, Towing, Puget Sound

Seeing the trees
Fall 2011
At the south end of Whidbey Island, off a tree-lined road, Linda Kast ’75 pulls her station wagon up to a gate and jumps out. She opens her hatchback and extracts a thick folder containing maps, a history, and an inventory of her smal...
Categories: Alumni, WSU Extension, Forestry
Tags: Forest management

Web Extra :: Looking into the Admiralty Head Lighthouse
Fall 2011
Admiralty Head Lighthouse, designed by architect Carl Leick in 1898 and opened in 1903, was built to guide ships into Puget Sound. It is now located at the Fort Casey State Park on Whidbey Island.Put your cursor on the squares below to look at the to...
Categories: Washington state history
Tags: Lighthouse

To the lighthouse
Fall 2011
For more than a century one of Washington’s earliest man-made landmarks has perched 120 feet above the sea on the bluff at Admiralty Head on Whidbey Island. In its early years, the lighthouse beacon guided the sailing ships that helped ...
Categories: History, Architecture and design
Tags: Parks, Lighthouse

Darnell Sue ’02—A girl and her power
Fall 2011
This thing called Girl Power is at work well before the scheduled hour of 6 p.m. A peek into Bellevue’s Pure Barre gym one evening in May offers a view of more than a half dozen women in dresses and high heels setting up tables, filli...
Categories: Business, Alumni
Tags: Networking, Women

Above & Beyond
Fall 2011
In the spring of 1792, George Vancouver praised “the delightful serenity of the weather.” A few years later, William Clark complained of a dour winter that was “cloudy, dark and disagreeable.” How right they both were. Weather patterns determined by mountains and ocean grant the Pacific Northwest a temperate climate that also has a dark and unpredictable side.
Categories: Earth sciences, Natural sciences, Environmental studies
Tags: Weather, Meteorology, Storms, Climate

Pumpkins
Fall 2011
It’s a rare fruit that can fit in the palm of your hand or grace your table with colorful aplomb and also grow to the size of a small car. But such is the pumpkin. Our long Northwest days are a dream for growing the embodiment of Americ...
Categories: Food
Tags: Pumpkins

Review :: A Home for Every Child
Summer 2011
 At the end of the 19th century, adoption became part of a broader movement to reform the orphanage and poor farm system in the United States. In her most recent book, Patricia Susan Hart, who teaches journalism and American studies ...
Categories: Social work, Washington state history
Tags: Children, Adoption

A plan for Washington
Summer 2011
In 1972, as Scott Carson was preparing to graduate from Washington State University, a counselor told him he was still six credits shy of his degree. The Vietnam veteran was astonished. “He said I had to complete these physical educat...
Categories: Alumni, Education
Tags: Campaign for Washington State University, Philanthropy, Gifts, Volunteer

The Things We Do for Our Dogs—and what they do for us
Summer 2011
In 1974 between 15 and 18 million dogs and cats were killed in animal control centers. To address what he perceived as “wide-spread irresponsible animal ownership,” Leo Bustad ’49 DVM created the People-Pet Partnership and promoted research into the human-animal bond. Although it is impossible to assess the total impact of his work, the number of animals killed today is down to four million. And the pet-people bond manifests itself in ways beyond his comprehension.
Categories: Veterinary medicine, Alumni
Tags: Dogs, Pets, Animal-human interaction, Animal behavior

Business is blooming
Summer 2011
On a sunny weekend in early spring, 40 farmers and would-be cut flower growers fill the second floor of the barn at Jello Mold Farm in the Skagit Valley. Bundled in their coats against the cool morning, they eagerly listen to more exper...
Categories: Business, Agriculture, WSU Extension
Tags: Flowers, Gardens

Kristine (McClary) Vannoy ’87—The facts of fudge
Summer 2011
“I’m easy to spot. I’m six-foot-two,” says Kristine (McClary) Vannoy, as we plan our meeting at an upscale grocery in Seattle. But when she appears, it’s not her height that’s eye-catching, or even her long red hair. It’s th...
Categories: Culinary Arts, Business, Alumni
Tags: Food, Fudge, Entrepreneurs

Review :: Mexican Women and the Other Side of Immigration: Engendering Transnational Ties
Spring 2011
There are communities of people who live their lives in two places at once. Residents of Detroit, Michigan, and the small town of San Ignacio, Mexico, for example. In her book, historian Luz Maria Gordillo sets out to explain the history of thi...
Categories: History, Gender studies
Tags: Immigration, Mexican Americans, Women

Outside In—Architecture of the Pacific Northwest
Spring 2011
Architecture in the Pacific Northwest has always had to contend with the environment. The results are enchanting.
Categories: Architecture and design, Alumni
Tags: Northwest architecture, Seattle, Buildings

An art history
Spring 2011
Worth D. Griffin stepped off the train in Pullman in the fall of 1924 to find Washington State College’s art department barely four years old and with just one other full-time faculty member. Prior to that, the only art instruction offe...
Categories: WSU faculty, WSU history, Fine Arts
Tags: Native Americans, Painting, Artists

Dungeness crab
Spring 2011
A few weeks ago, Brian Toste ’99 and his three-man crew set out from Westport, in southwest Washington, in Toste’s 45-foot vessel Huntress in search of Dungeness crab. They spent the first few days tying line and setting out ...
Categories: Business, Food
Tags: Commercial fishermen, Fishing, Dungeness, Crab

George Nethercutt Jr. ’67—Knowing our nation
Spring 2011
George Nethercutt Jr. ’67 may not be in Congress anymore, but he still yearns to shorten the distance between Washington, D.C., and his home state of Washington.The effort has kept the Spokane native busy since he left the House of Repres...
Categories: Education, Public affairs, Alumni
Tags: Politicians, Civic education

A sinking economy sparks scholarships
Winter 2010
Two years ago, Lou Pepper watched the bank he once managed become the largest bank failure in U.S. history.Pepper, a former Washington State University regent, had retired from Washington Mutual in the early 1990s when the bank was sound. But then ...
Categories: Campus life, WSU students
Tags: Economy, Scholarships, Financial aid, College costs

Mary Kaufman-Cranney ’78—Call of the wild
Winter 2010
Last summer Mary Kaufman-Cranney culled a batch of black dresses from her closet and replaced them with hiking boots and trail shoes. Having left her job with the Seattle Opera, where she was director of development, she has less use for the ...
Categories: Environmental studies, Public affairs, Alumni
Tags: Conservation, Fundraising, The Nature Conservancy

Joe Fugere ’84—Feeding his interests
Winter 2010
Joe Fugere opened Tutta Bella pizzeria in Columbia City in 2004. A veteran of several Northwest-based companies, including Starbucks and Taco Time, he decided it was time to go into business for himself and produce true traditional Naples-st...
Categories: Food, Culinary Arts, Alumni
Tags: Pizza, Restaurants

Betty and Peggy Lee in 1936
Winter 2010
One day in 1936 Betty Lee and her twin sister Peggy, about four years old, posed for their mother in the Washington State College shirts given to them by Carl Morrow, then Dean of Men at WSU.Their parents, Don and Julia Lee, moved to Pullman in...
Categories: Alumni, WSU history
Tags: 1936, College Hill, WSU staff

Where land and water meet
Winter 2010
For Todd Mitchell '97, the purchase of Kiket Island near Deception Pass meant the return of  a cultural resource to his people. For the other myriad residents of the Puget Sound area, it is another decisive step toward restoring a priceless resource.
Categories: Washington state history, Environmental studies
Tags: Conservation, Parks, Deception Pass, Puget Sound, Kiket Island

Back to the city
Fall 2010
As King County's farm specialist, Steve Evans '78, '82 has watched agriculture disappear from the area. But now some of the land is going to smaller farms with high value crops. Meanwhile, small farms agent Bee Cha helps East African refugees farm in the urban Pacific Northwest.
Categories: Agriculture, WSU Extension
Tags: Seattle, Urban farming, Tacoma, Extension, Farmers markets

A measure of time and history
Fall 2010
Matthew Cohen started wondering if what he knew of Renaissance architecture was true when he stepped into the San Lorenzo Basilica in Florence with a measuring tape.The Italian city, known as the birthplace of the Renaissance, is home to many o...
Categories: Architecture and design
Tags: Renaissance, Italy, Filippo Brunelleschi

Round-Up and recovery
Fall 2010
Locals often see Mike and Jill Thorne on the two-lane highway between their ranch outside Pendleton and the Oregon city’s rodeo grounds. As the 100thanniversary of the Pendleton Round-Up comes in September, the couple is busy preparing both t...
Categories: Alumni, Business
Tags: Rodeos, Pendleton

Hans Breivik ’88—About a bridge
Fall 2010
Tacoma certainly has had its share of broken bridges. But lately Hans Breivik ’88 has been coordinating the repair of one of them.The double-bascule bridge across the Hylebos Waterway at the Port of Tacoma was built in 1938 and has been frozen ...
Categories: Engineering, Alumni
Tags: Civil engineering, Bridges

Kevin Tomlinson ’75—Back to the garden
Fall 2010
On a roadtrip with a friend in 1988, Kevin Tomlinson stumbled onto what would be the seed of a great story. At the time, he just knew he had to collect it and save it.“We were out to see the American West,” says the filmmaker, who graduat...
Categories: Visual arts, Alumni
Tags: Film, Back to the Land movement, Movies, Documentary

Derren Patterson '07—Dangerous beauty
Summer 2010
Derren Patterson went out to see the world and landed in Bolivia leading bicycle tours down the world’s most dangerous road.Patterson is one for adventure. After graduating from WSU with a history degree, he decided to travel, paying for it f...
Categories: Alumni, Recreation
Tags: Mountain biking, Bolivia

Time Out in the World
Summer 2010
Today's graduates aren't just dropping into the rat race. They're going to Africa, South America, Seattle and Spokane. They're out to see the world and make a difference.
Categories: Social work, Alumni
Tags: Charity, International development, Housing, Volunteer

WSU myths and legends
Summer 2010
Every school has its myths and legends. Washington State’s include miles of secret underground tunnels, a ghost, giant cows, and an icon of the psychedelic 60s. We decided to define, dispel, and debunk these stories. The results may surprise ...
Categories: WSU history, Campus life
Tags: Myths, Legends

The best berries
Summer 2010
These are not your ordinary grocery store strawberries. They are nothing like those California berries, bred for size, long truck rides, and shelf-life, locked in plastic clamshells under the florescent lights of the produce section,. The berries...
Categories: Agriculture, Food
Tags: Skagit Valley, Strawberry, Strawberries, Fruit

Annie Thiessen '99—The pacemaker
Summer 2010
“I wasn’t always fast,” says Annie Thiessen, a Tacoma veterinarian who in the past 10 years has won well over 30 marathons. “I just don’t know what happened.” But she does know when it happened. It was 2005 and she was competing i...
Categories: Athletics, Recreation, Alumni
Tags: Marathons, Running

Dan Nelson '89—25,000 miles of trails
Summer 2010
Dan Nelson knows his way around Washington’s woods. As the author of a dozen books on hikes, snowshoe trips, and trails throughout the Cascades, Eastern Washington, and the Olympic Peninsula, he’s logged thousands of miles for research.“I...
Categories: Alumni, Recreation
Tags: Hiking, Trails, Writers

Vancouver Lake: A Search for Solutions Great and Small
Spring 2010
This is the second time WSU scientists have worked on a plan to clean up Vancouver Lake. The first, in the 1960s, was monumental. This time it's microscopic.
Categories: Engineering, Biological sciences
Tags: Microbiology, Lakes, Vancouver

Leave it to beavers
Spring 2010
As we crunch through the snow in the hills above Winthrop, Steve Bondi ’02 and Ryan Anderson ’08 are eager to see evidence that their project to improve riparian habitat and provide late season water to the Methow Valley is working. They...
Categories: Biological sciences, Environmental studies
Tags: Ecology, Beavers

Cougar Links—Palouse Ridge homecoming
Spring 2010
A little more than a year after the grand opening of the Palouse Ridge Golf Club in Pullman, the 315-acre course has garnered national attention as one of the best new courses in the country. It has also gained a cadre of Cougar alums who hav...
Categories: Business, Alumni, Athletics
Tags: Palouse Ridge, Golf

Desperately Seeking Sherman
Spring 2010
Although his work is increasingly ubiquitous, the writer Sherman Alexie ’94 is a little harder to pin down. Our correspondent is undaunted.
Categories: Literature, Alumni
Tags: Native Americans, Authors, Writers

Review :: Women's Voices: The Campaign for Equal Rights in Washington
Spring 2010
This year marks the 100-year anniversary of women’s suffrage in Washington state. As the fifth state in the Union to allow women to vote, Washington’s landmark was more than a half-century in the making. In fact, in 1883, when Washington wa...
Categories: History, Washington state history, Political science
Tags: Women

Skagit Valley studies
Spring 2010
One student has been wading into Padilla Bay to look at eelgrass, another hikes into spinach fields to see if lime can protect the plant from fusarium wilt, and a third is studying the dynamics of conflict among farmers, landowners, environme...
Categories: WSU students, Agriculture
Tags: Research

What I’ve Learned Since College: Joni Earl ’75—CEO of Sound Transit
Spring 2010
When Joni Earl ’75 joined Sound Transit in 2000, she was unaware of the crisis facing the agency, which provides public transportation for Snohomish, King, and Pierce counties. As the new Chief Operating Officer, she was asked to review the s...
Categories: Alumni, Business
Tags: Sound Transit, Transportation, Trains

Paper cuts
Winter 2009
Not that many years ago Washington's legislature was covered by more than 30 journalists from around the state. Now that number is eight. The Seattle Times no longer has a bureau on the east side of Lake Washington, and a print Post-Intelligencer no longer exists. Who will give us information and investigation when the papers have all gone?
Categories: Communication, Media, Public affairs
Tags: Journalism, Newspapers, Blogs

Stormwater central
Winter 2009
There’s nothing mundane about the new parking lot at the WSU research and extension center in Puyallup. It is a state-of-the-art polluted water collection system. The 70-some parking spots are specially designed to drain the water from each spa...
Categories: WSU Extension, Environmental studies
Tags: Sustainability, Ecology, Water quality, Stormwater

Housing by the numbers
Winter 2009
From his corner office in Johnson Tower in the midst of Washington State University’s Pullman campus, Glenn Crellin is far from the most populated parts of the state. Still, from his vantage, he contemplates rental rates around the Puget Sound,...
Categories: Business, Economics
Tags: Real estate, Housing, Homebuyers

Track to the future
Winter 2009
It was only a few decades ago that Northern Pacific Railroad ran daily trains from Spokane through Pullman and down to Lewiston. And train cars loaded with students and steamer trunks came over the Cascades delivering their lively loads to packed ...
Categories: Architecture and design, WSU Spokane
Tags: Trains, Railroad, Transportation, Palouse

Clams
Winter 2009
Displaced by the salmon and eclipsed by the oyster, the clam is perhaps the forgotten star of the Puget Sound. But once it was the main seafood symbol of the region. Even before restaurateur Ivar Haglund made his “Acres of Clams” restaurant a ...
Categories: Food
Tags: Clams

Nöel Riley Fitch '65, '69—At Julia's table
Winter 2009
As a graduate student at Washington State University in the late 1960s, Noël Riley Fitch found her calling in an issue of Ladies’ Home Journal. A two-page story about Sylvia Beach and her little bookshop called Shakespeare and Company in Paris i...
Categories: Alumni, English
Tags: Writers, Julia Child, Cooking, Biographers

Review :: Greenscapes—Olmsted’s Pacific Northwest
Fall 2009
John Charles Olmsted, nephew and stepson of world-famous park designer Frederick Law Olmsted Sr. and half brother of landscape architect Frederick Law Olmsted Jr., spent much of his life in the shadows of his more famous relatives. Even so, on the...
Categories: Architecture and design
Tags: Gardening, Landscape architecture

Master Gardeners
Fall 2009
"Cultivating plants, people, and communities since 1973" is how the Master Gardeners explain themselves. The concept has worked well. Washington, where it all started, now has over 3,000 volunteer Master Gardeners, who in exchange for training in turn give their knowledge and expertise to others in their communities. These communities have now spread across the United States and Canada.
Categories: WSU Extension, Agriculture
Tags: Gardens, Gardening

Curbing aggressive driving
Fall 2009
There’s something about youth and speed and cars.Criminal justice doctoral student Yu-Sheng Lin tapped into it in his study of risky and aggressive driving behaviors. Surveying Washington State University students, who averaged the age of 19, he ...
Categories: Psychology, Social sciences
Tags: Aggressive driving, Criminal justice

What I've Learned Since College: An interview with Maurice (Sandy) Pearson
Fall 2009
Maurice Pearson was born in Chicago in 1904. When he was just a year old, his family moved west and settled in Ferndale on 40 acres near the Lummi Indian reservation. Everyone called him Sandy because of his red hair.After high school, Pearson wor...
Categories: Alumni
Tags: Dance

Puppy mills closed for good
Fall 2009
Last January investigators in Mount Vernon raided one of the largest puppy mill operations in state history. They found close to 400 animals. Many of the dogs were sick, in filthy cages, and had insufficient food and water. Days later a similar r...
Categories: Veterinary medicine
Tags: Puppy mills, Animal rescue, Dogs

S.R. Martin Jr.—A life in the West
Fall 2009
“Rudy” Martin started out with a plan to collect the history of his family from its Texas roots to his home in Washington. It was at first a project for himself and his children. But the American studies scholar yearned for context, color, and...
Categories: History, Alumni
Tags: African Americans, American West

WSU Presidents—An evening of honors
Fall 2009
In late June nearly 200 people gathered to recognize Washington State University’s presidents emeriti Glenn Terrell (1967–1985), Sam Smith (1985–2000), and V. Lane Rawlins (2000–2007). The event kicked off a fundraising effort for need-bas...
Categories: WSU history, WSU faculty
Tags: WSU presidents

A Seat at the Table: Senator Patty Murray '72
Summer 2009
When Patty Murray '72, after a year as a state legislator, set her sights on the U.S. Senate, she got little encouragement. “You haven't paid your dues,” they said. “You don't have enough money. You don't know the right people.” None of that made any difference to Murray.
Categories: Public affairs, Alumni
Tags: Politicians

Spring is the season for chèvre
Summer 2009
After a winter’s break, the goats at Rhonda Gothberg’s farm have kidded and their milk is rich and sweet. The soft French-style cheese she makes is delicious with just a nuance of that goat tang. Maybe it’s because the animals have added ten...
Categories: Agriculture, Food
Tags: Goats, Cheese

Art Still at Large
Summer 2009
An episode of the Antiques Road Show television program last winter stirred some memories across the Palouse and brought to mind one of the most influential alumni to graduate from Washington State’s fine arts program. A woman from California b...
Categories: Fine Arts
Tags: Artists, Clyfford Still

Review :: Uncle Phil and the Atomic Bomb
Summer 2009
I was lucky enough to meet Philip Abelson in 2002 on the occasion of his visit to Pullman for the dedication of Abelson Hall (formerly Science Hall) in honor of the scientist and his wife Dr. Neva Abelson ’34. During our brief interview, Abelso...
Categories: Physics, WSU history
Tags: Manhattan Project, Atomic bomb

Review :: 1200 Weeds—of the 48 States & Adjacent Canada
Summer 2009
When you don’t know what you’re dealing with, weedy plants may be hard to handle. Richard Old, a longtime Pullman resident and weed identification expert, has put together this comprehensive database of weeds for both public and private use. ...
Categories: Agriculture
Tags: Invasive weeds

Jacqueline van Wormer–Advocacy for juveniles
Summer 2009
One morning this winter, the Benton County Juvenile Justice Center is quiet since most of the residents are in classrooms and only one teen waits in lock-up. A couple of the guards are having an early lunch at a table at the end of the long corrid...
Categories: Alumni
Tags: Criminal justice, Juvenile justice

Living Large: In search of the elusive large animal veterinarian
Summer 2009
Nearly 500 counties in the United States have large herds of cattle, but no veterinarians to care for them. Although veterinary student Sam Nielson claims that it’s the life of the large animal veterinarian that he’s after, not money, fewer and fewer feel that way, moving to other types of practices that offer both better working conditions and compensation.
Categories: Veterinary medicine
Tags: Animal health, Large animals

Whatever Happened to Home Economics?
Summer 2009
Lately, you may have considered tightening your home budget, planting a vegetable garden in your yard, eating at home, making food from scratch instead of out of the box, teaching your kids instead of hiring a tutor, mending your sweater instead ...
Categories: WSU history, Culinary Arts
Tags: Extension, Home economics

Roger McClellan - A suitable combination
Spring 2009
As a teen, Roger McClellan ’60 D.V.M. went to work at his high school farm. By helping manage a flock of sheep that were a control group in a Hanford nuclear facility study, he became part of a major research project on radioactivity in animals. ...
Categories: Alumni, Biological sciences
Tags: Biochemistry

Space Chronicles
Spring 2009
Working on her doctorate at Washington State University, Jennifer Ross-Nazzal ’04 was drawn to public history–a field that combines academic history with non-traditional methods of collecting and presenting historical information. The program...
Categories: Space sciences, History
Tags: Space exploration, NASA

Hotel at the Top
Spring 2009
Pioneer James “Cashup” Davis dreamed big. At a time when most Washington settlers were carving farms out of the Palouse, he was so awed with the panoramic views of the Palouse from Steptoe Butte, he decided to build a hotel at the top. Davis’s...
Categories: Washington state history, History
Tags: Palouse, Hotels

Jason Ambrose '99 - Counting beans in Costa Rica
Spring 2009
Jason Ambrose learned to drink coffee as a college freshman. “Then it was more about function than flavor,” he admits. These days, Ambrose starts his morning with a French press. He heats milk for his son Jackson, who is not yet two, and water ...
Categories: Alumni, Business
Tags: Coffee

The Love Letters
Spring 2009
In 1907, Othello had no high school, so Xerpha Mae McCulloch '30 traveled 50 miles to Ritzville to finish school. There she met, and fell in love with, Edward Gaines, a few years her senior. The recent gift to Washington State University of her steamer trunk reveals the life of a woman whose story is not only threaded through the University's, but also through the story of agriculture in Washington State.
Categories: Memoirs, WSU history, Agriculture
Tags: WSU staff, Xerpha Gaines, Botany

On the waterfront
Winter 2008
Tacoma's past may be a key to its future :: Twenty years ago, the City Club of Tacoma approached the city with a plan to unify the waterfront and build a walking path from the Tacoma Dome to Point Defiance. The painstakingly researched report urged that the entire waterfront be redesigned as a people place. Lara Hermann '95 was thrilled when a city hall worker handed her the document. "It was like a present just lands in your lap," she says.
Categories: Geography, Public affairs
Tags: Tacoma, Urban planning

Living free from addiction
Winter 2008
When an alumnus like Bus Hollingbery '44, a former Cougar linebacker and son of football coaching legend "Babe" Hollingbery, comes to the university with a good idea, the university listens. A few years ago, Hollingbery, a recovering alcoholic, w...
Categories: Campus life, Social work
Tags: Addiction, Rehabilitation

Who moved my cupola?
Winter 2008
During a quiet weekend last July, a crew came to campus to steal away one of the University's oldest landmarks--the Ferry Hall cupola. The quaint 12-foot by 12-foot Georgian-style structure had already survived more than a century and a major relo...
Categories: WSU history, Architecture and design
Tags: Ferry Hall

Everybody reads
Winter 2008
When Mary Roach was researching her book on human cadavers, she attended a seminar where plastic surgeons practiced techniques on severed human heads. She also visited a body farm in Tennessee to see remains in various states of decay. And she sto...
Categories: Literature
Tags: Cadavers, Reading

Murrow's door
Winter 2008
First came the doorknob.The workers in the office of Washington State University's school of communication didn't know what to expect when the first of two shipments arrived from New York last spring. But they opened the box, took out the old door...
Categories: Communication
Tags: Edward R. Murrow

A Season for Seeds
Winter 2008
STRANGE THINGS sprout in Skagit Valley's fields: Monster plants with six-foot stalks covered with yellow flowers, delicate ferny-leaved things with round white heads holding hundreds of tiny blossoms, and unruly tangles of leaves, spears, and spik...
Categories: Food, Agriculture
Tags: Seeds

What I've Learned Since College: An interview with Sonny Spearman
Winter 2008
Sonny Spearman '86 has traded technology for toys. As co-founder and chief marketing and operating officer of Matter Group, she leads a company focused on creating products to foster awareness of the environment.Spearman started her career in tech...
Categories: Alumni, Business
Tags: Games

A new college guide
Fall 2008
The market is full of books on how to get into and succeed in college, but few of those books are targeted at students who may be the first in their family to go beyond high school. Even fewer are targeted specifically to the needs of Native Ameri...
Categories: Education, Campus life
Tags: Native Americans

The Higher Costs of College
Fall 2008
When it comes to paying the tuition, creative savvy may be a Cougar characteristic. Some do the expected—sell blood at the plasma center in Pullman, offer themselves up for psychology studies on campus, and find jobs either at the university or at a local restaurant. Others, over history, have been even more creative.
Categories: Campus life
Tags: Tuition, College costs

60 minutes with Don Hewitt
Fall 2008
This spring, while a reporter from a Spokane TV station sat face to face with 60 Minutes creator Don Hewitt, two Washington State University communications students waited quietly in the hall for their turn with the television legend. Jamie Gro...
Categories: Communication
Tags: Television broadcasting

BJ Duft - Of meals and missions
Fall 2008
At age 24, BJ Duft found himself in Bill Marriott's private jet face-to-face with the CEO of Marriott International. They were headed back to Washington D.C. from Penn State University where Duft '86 had gone to do some on-campus recruitin...
Categories: Alumni, Agriculture
Tags: Restaurants, Organic foods

The end is the beginning. A photo essay
Fall 2008
A Chinese native who was born during the Cultural Revolution, Jian Yang '08 found his artistic self somewhere in between his home country and the United States. That understanding of the in-between is perhaps why, on a visit home after spending some time here in graduate school, he discovered a fascination for the disappearing tradition of rural Chinese opera.
Categories: Visual arts
Tags: Photography, China, Theatre

Dahlias
Summer 2008
When Dan Pearson was eight years old, his father brought a batch of brown tubers home and planted them in the yard. Intrigued, Dan helped tend the vigorous plants that sprang from them and watched them bloom into flashy, brightly hued flowers, som...
Categories: Agriculture
Tags: Flowers, Dahlias

Age of Identity
Summer 2008
Debbie Lee journeyed across an ocean and traveled back two centuries to find some of history's most infamous imposters. She came home with a new understanding of culture and identity.
Categories: History, Literature
Tags: England, Identity

An interview with Edward Heinemann - a life of horse sense
Summer 2008
Ed Heinemann was just a freshman in the spring of 1936, when the students at Washington State decided to strike. A group calling themselves the Student Liberty Association wanted more freedom from the administration's puritanical social regulatio...
Categories: Alumni
Tags: Horses

Parkinson's house
Summer 2008
For a Parkinson's patient, every day is different. One day the symptoms could include tremors and muscle stiffness. Another might bring difficulty eating and swallowing. But every day, Parkinson's is a progressive, chronic, debilitating disease th...
Categories: Architecture and design
Tags: Parkinson's disease

A home for hotel history
Summer 2008
One day in the late 1920s, hoteliers Severt W. Thurston and Frank Dupar met by chance in a coffee shop in Yakima, Washington. Unbeknownst to one another, each had gone to Yakima to make separate hotel deals. But by the time they parted company tha...
Categories: History
Tags: Hotel management, Hotels

What I've learned since college: An interview with Johnnetta B. Cole-anthropologist, author, activist
Spring 2008
Johnnetta B. Cole launched her career as an educator and activist at Washington State University in 1964. While in Pullman, she taught anthropology, helped found the Black Studies Program, and served as the program’s first director. In 1970 she...
Categories: Alumni
Tags: African Americans, Anthropology, Writing

A taste of history
Spring 2008
Methow Valley, best known for its miles of Nordic skiing and other outdoor recreation, has developed a new note, one that lands it in Seattle's culinary scene. The rare heritage grains from Sam and Brooke Lucy's Bluebird Grain farms have found the...
Categories: Food
Tags: Emmer, Heritage grains

Bernard Lagat comes home
Spring 2008
On his first morning back in Pullman, world track and field champion Bernard Lagat ’01 pulled on his running shoes and said a quick goodbye to his wife, Gladys Tom ’00, and son, Miika. It was 8 a.m. and about 19 degrees outside. But the mornin...
Categories: Athletics
Tags: Track and field

Ode to a tea set
Spring 2008
A HANDCRAFTED STERLING SILVER TEA SET, its long rectangular surfaces modern in design, gleams from its perch on a bookshelf in an apartment high above Seattle, the home of the man who designed it.The simple geometry of the set’s four serving pie...
Categories: Architecture and design
Tags: Dishes

Closing minds: How layoffs can be bad for business
Spring 2008
One of the best ways to kill a worker’s creativity is to tell him his job is on the line. Tahira Probst, an associate professor of psychology at Washington State University Vancouver, has explored that notion through a combination of laboratory...
Categories: Business
Tags: Employment

A school in the woods
Spring 2008
Many of the children who visit IslandWood have never been to the woods. Some are afraid to try new things, to walk in the woods at night, to touch a slug or pull apart a wild mushroom. Now, they're as much a part of the place as the wildlife.
Categories: Education, Environmental studies
Tags: Environmental education

Language lessons
Winter 2007
When Saad Alshahrani came to graduate school at Washington State University, he didn't speak a bit of English.Addled by the long flights from Saudi Arabia, he tried to walk out of the airport in Seattle. He didn't understand that his new home was ...
Categories: Cultural studies, Languages and linguistics
Tags: Arabic

Secrets & Spies
Winter 2007
The Office of Strategic Services, our country's first centralized intelligence agency, was formed during the Second World War to train men and women in the arts of sabotage and espionage and then to send them around the world to protect our nation's interests. Among the many Washington State College students and alumni who served in that conflict, five friends and classmates trained together in the OSS, then went to North Africa, Italy, England, and China to help win the war.
Categories: Alumni, Military sciences
Tags: World War II, OSS, Spies, Espionage

Into the woods
Winter 2007
Unseen worlds live behind the bark and beneath the trees in Pacific Northwest forests. Scientists Jack Rogers and Lori Carris have made careers out of discovering these worlds and studying them. We go into the woods with them to glimpse the secret lives of fungi and their roles in nature.
Categories: Botany, Biological sciences
Tags: Mushrooms, Mycology, Fungi

One Hundred Apple Cups
Winter 2007
The first contest between cross-state rivals Washington State and the University of Washington took place on a muddy field in Seattle in November 1900. The Washington Agricultural College "Farmers," as we were known then, made the 290-mile trek fr...
Categories: Athletics
Tags: Apple Cup, Football

History was made...The fight for equity for women's athletics in Washington
Winter 2007
Back in the late 1960s, when Jo Washburn was athletic director for women's intramural sports at Washington State University, she had to stretch $1,200 to cover all the expenses of the volleyball, gymnastics, basketball, field hockey, skiing, and t...
Categories: Gender studies, Athletics
Tags: Women's studies, Women's sports, Title IX, Women athletes

Celebrating a century at Seattle's liveliest landmark
Fall 2007
It started a century ago, on August 17, 1907, when a small group of farmers set up stalls at the corner of First and Pike in Seattle and sold their produce right on the street. They claimed their little city-sponsored market experiment was born ou...
Categories: Washington state history, History
Tags: Farmers markets, Seattle

A burning mystery
Fall 2007
During spring break in April 1970 an arson fire destroyed the wood stands of Washington State University's football stadium. The Cougars were forced to play off campus for two years while the University built a new stadium. To thi...
Categories: WSU history, Athletics
Tags: Football, Crimes

Police in the dorms: Security or invasion of privacy?
Fall 2007
One Friday night last winter, a Washington State University police officer walked past the open door of a student's room in Stephenson East and looked in. She smiled and said "Hey," and received a cool "Hi" in reply. As soon as she walked past, th...
Categories: Campus life, WSU students
Tags: Residence halls

Behold the blackberry
Fall 2007
Blackberry is a flavor of fall in the Pacific Northwest. Whether you sample blackberries straight from the bush, still warm from the sun, or bake it into a pie and top it with a cool scoop of ice cream, it's a deep, sweet taste that conjures up th...
Categories: Food
Tags: Blackberry

Their place in history: WSU women athletes made their mark
Fall 2007
One day in 1948 four Washington State College students tugged on their white rubber swim caps, adjusted their nose plugs, and plunged into a cold swimming pool. Three of them locked together head to foot to form a vertical underwater ring, and the...
Categories: Gender studies, Athletics
Tags: Women's sports, Women athletes

Food fights
Fall 2007
Four children died in the 1993 Jack in the Box E. coli outbreak. Attorney Bill Marler's client survived, but only after spending six months in the hospital. Marler sued and won a $15.6 million settlement for Brianne Kiner. Even more significant, the work he produced for the case made him an expert not only on E. coli, but on the whole food production system.
Categories: Alumni, Public affairs, Law
Tags: Food-borne illness, Food poisoning

Hops & beer
Summer 2007
Raising the raw ingredients for beer can be just as complex and interesting as growing grapes for wine, says Jason Perrault '97, '01. Like grapes, hops have different varieties and characteristics. Perrault, fourth-generation heir to a hops-farming legacy, runs a hops breeding program for Yakima Valley growers, helping to ensure that Washington continues to provide three-quarters of the hops grown in this country.
Categories: Business, Agriculture
Tags: Hops, Beer

Hoop dreams
Summer 2007
Cougar fans are still shaking themselves awake from the dream that was the 2006-07 basketball season.The sweet reverie set in early this winter during a game against Gonzaga at Friel Court. For the first time in years, a scrappy bunch of mostly ju...
Categories: Athletics
Tags: Basketball

Anatomy of Murder: Robert Keppel '66 Police Science, '67 MA Police Science
Summer 2007
In 1974, during Robert Keppel's second week as a major crimes detective with the King County Sheriff's Office, he was assigned the cases of two women who had gone missing on the same day from Lake Samammish. They turned out to be two of Ted Bundy'...
Categories: Law, Alumni
Tags: Criminal justice, Police

Dana Patterson: The path ahead
Summer 2007
Yellow Springs, Ohio, is a small college community with a rich history of social justice. It was a stop on the Underground Railroad and, much later, home to Antioch College, where civil rights activist Coretta Scott King went to school.Dana Patter...
Categories: Public affairs, Alumni
Tags: Social justice, Civil rights

It felt like coming home
Summer 2007
With Lane Rawlins, Washington State University has "become what a lot of people envisioned it could be." Even though he has plenty of ideas of what to do next, it is time to hand over the presidency.
Categories: WSU faculty, WSU history
Tags: WSU presidents

Foraged foods: Serving up a traditional meal from the Columbia plateau
Spring 2007
In a wooded spot a half-mile from Washington State University's Pullman campus, an older woman with long braids and an apron emblazoned with the words "got buns?" tended an alderwood fire. Geraldine Jim, a salmon expert from the Warm Springs Reser...
Categories: Food
Tags: Forage, Native Americans

Spillman memorial rededicated
Spring 2007
A memorial marker for William Jasper Spillman, a crop research pioneer and one of Washington State College's first professors, was returned to campus last fall.Spillman was the sixth faculty member to be hired at WSC, and the researcher responsibl...
Categories: WSU faculty, Agriculture
Tags: Memorials

An interview with Horace Alexander Young, musician and teacher
Spring 2007
Horace Alexander Young '83 teaches woodwinds and jazz studies at Washington State University and tours the world as a member of Abdullah Ibrahim's jazz sextet, EKAYA. He plays woodwinds, keyboards, and percussion. He also sings and composes, and ...
Categories: Music, Alumni
Tags: Jazz

John Leitzinger: Racing with the wind
Spring 2007
On a small boat with six other guys, with about two weeks to travel 2,300 nautical miles, you really want to be with agreeable people.That was John Leitzinger's philosophy when he was looking for teammates to sail with him in the 2006 Vic-Maui Int...
Categories: Athletics, Alumni
Tags: Yacht racing, Sailing

WSU welcomes a new president
Spring 2007
Elson S. Floyd was named the 10th president of Washington State University in December. He and his wife, Carmento, will be moving to Washington from Missouri this spring.
Categories: WSU faculty, WSU history
Tags: WSU presidents

Vaulting ambition
Spring 2007
Despite the icy air of the late October afternoon, Todd Griffiths strips down to his skin-tight spandex uniform and lifts himself atop a bay horse named Darby. His legs move forward and in one fluid swing are back behind him, pulling him into a ha...
Categories: Athletics
Tags: Horses, Vaulting

Jeff Clark: Elegant antiques
Winter 2006
The object of Jeff Clark's desire once belonged to the Shah of Iran. The shiny black 1939 Bugatti Type 57C was originally commissioned by the French government and given to the Shah as a present on the occasion of his first marriage. Today the roa...
Categories: Alumni
Tags: Charity, Antiques, Automobiles, Cars

Vicki Owens: Into Africa
Winter 2006
Twenty-one years ago Vicki Owens stepped off an airplane into the hot air of Kampala, Uganda, thinking she had come for a brief stay, just long enough to help Christian missionary pastors start a primary school."I thought I'd do my little thing fo...
Categories: Education, Alumni
Tags: Africa, Uganda

What color is your potato?
Winter 2006
Remember when picking a potato was easy? You had your choice: bake or boil?Today there are dozens of decisions. Waxy? dry? fingerling? yellow? red? blue? banana?That world of choice started the early 1980s, when the Yukon Gold emerged from a breed...
Categories: Food
Tags: Potatoes

An equation for beauty
Winter 2006
The painter spends his days on the third floor of an ancient biscuit plant in a seedy section of industrial Ballard. The building, just a block from the Ballard Bridge, houses a collection of artists, mostly ceramicists whose main-floor kiln warms...
Categories: Fine Arts, Visual arts
Tags: Painting, Artists

The brave new world of college recruiting
Winter 2006
Recruitment used to mean visiting high schools and mailing out applications. Today, with fierce competition for Washington's top students, recruitment is a complex program of target marketing, scholarships, campus visits, and the close attention of admissions counselors.
Categories: WSU students
Tags: Enrollment

Web Extra :: Video: The wonderful world of printed ephemera
Winter 2006
View an exclusive slide show about printed ephemera and to hear Trevor Bond of WSU's Manuscripts, Archives, and Special Collections talk about his experience working with English chapbooks. Photos are by Trevor Bond. Read the story, "...
Categories: History, Library and museum studies
Tags: Video, Ephemera, England, Chapbooks

The sportswriter
Winter 2006
If Janie McCauley were telling this story, she wouldn't bury the lead. She'd say right away that she is the Associated Press's 2006 Sports Writer of the Year. Add a little color, some solid quotes like, "I was surprised to get the award. Ther...
Categories: Athletics, Communication
Tags: Sportswriters, Journalism

Bellevue metropolitan
Fall 2006
Since 1869, Bellevue has morphed from pioneer settlement to Norman-Rockwell small town to burgeoning suburb of Seattle. Now, with the help of a handful of WSU-trained architects, it's high-stepping into its new role as one of Washington's most vital urban centers.
Categories: Architecture and design
Tags: Seattle, Bellevue

What I've Learned Since College: An interview with R. Dale Storr
Fall 2006
On February 2, 1991, during the first Iraq war, Capt. R. Dale Storr ('83 Mech. Engr.) was captured by Iraqi soldiers after his A-10 Thunderbolt was shot down near Kuwait. The 29-year-old Air Force pilot from Spokane was a prisoner of war for 33 da...
Categories: Military sciences, Alumni
Tags: Air Force, Iraq

Blogger's world
Fall 2006
Amelia Veneziano, a junior at Washington State University, has a weakness when it comes time to do her homework. When she settles in to her Pullman apartment and turns on her computer, instead of researching a paper or e-mailing a professor, she k...
Categories: WSU students, Communication, Websites
Tags: Internet, Blogs

A home for music
Fall 2006
You don't always need an address to find the Friel House. Just follow the music.A short walk from campus, a group of music-minded students have found a home on C Street. The house looks small from the curb, but its three stories shelter seven stud...
Categories: Campus life, Music
Tags: Buildings, Music

The coming of age of teen films
Fall 2006
As a teen, Sarah Hentges had Wonder Woman and Princess Leia as her pop culture role models. One flew an invisible plane, and the other lived in another galaxy. Neither offered much of an idea of how a young American woman should be.As a Washington...
Categories: Gender studies
Tags: Movies, Film, Adolescence, Girls

Cherries—The sweet fruit of worry
Summer 2006
In March, Don Olmstead Jr. ('70 Hort.) watches over his cherry trees night and day, ready to activate a heating system or switch on the wind machines to protect the tender buds from a killing frost. It's a task he shares with his son and business ...
Categories: Agriculture, Food
Tags: Horticulture, Cherries

What I've Learned Since College: An interview with Robbie Tobeck
Summer 2006
Seahawk Center Robbie Tobeck ('94 Phys. Ed.) has spent the past 13 years playing professional football. After going to both the Super Bowl and Pro Bowl last February, he took some time off to focus on his four children, McKenzie, Mason, Mia, and M...
Categories: Athletics, Alumni
Tags: Football

The making of mountaineers
Summer 2006
Danielle Fisher gave herself five years to become the youngest person to climb the highest mountain on every continent. The Washington State University student did it in two, joining the ranks in 2005 of an elite fellowship of climbers who got their start on Washington's peaks.
Categories: Alumni
Tags: Hiking, Leadership, Mountain climbing

Foreign stories
Summer 2006
Crista Ames and Junko Matsumura are both bright, friendly, and soft-spoken. They are just a few months apart in age. And both want to go out and see the world.It was these common interests that brought the student from Kennewick and the student fr...
Categories: WSU students, Campus life
Tags: On Campus Living, Foreign Exchange

Iraq fallen remembered: Jaimie Campbell, James Shull, Damien Ficek
Summer 2006
In late January students, friends, and faculty gathered on the Pullman campus for a memorial service and candlelight vigil for First Lieutenant Jaime (Krausse) Campbell, who died when the BlackHawk helicopter she was flying went down in northern I...
Categories: Alumni
Tags: In memoriam, Iraq, Veterans

Busting out
Summer 2006
One rainy afternoon this spring filmmaker Francine Strickwerda entered the El Diablo coffee shop in Seattle. She ordered a cubano latte and then sat at a table overlooking Queen Anne Avenue. She looked around the busy room. The scene brought back ...
Categories: Visual arts, Alumni
Tags: Movies, Breast cancer, Documentary

Cooking is its own reward
Spring 2006
Betsy Rogers '89 had her eureka moment while sitting in a cooking class. It was 2000, and the Seattle-based public relations specialist had recently lost her job in a downsizing. Instead of jumping back into a new job, she decided to freelance an...
Categories: Alumni, Culinary Arts, Food
Tags: Careers, Food

Bridging two cultures
Spring 2006
A small school district radically retools to serve its Hispanic students.
Categories: Education, WSU students
Tags: Latinos, Latinas, Diversity, High school students

Digital Daddies
Spring 2006
Aaron Johnson and Cliff Knopik, the odd couple of young parenthood, sit together in Johnson's Puyallup dining room while his newborn daughter, Brooklyn, sleeps in a bedroom nearby. His wife, Heather, makes dinner in their small apartment kitchen.A...
Categories: Communication, Alumni
Tags: WSU parents, Child development, Broadcasting

Ghost Towns of the Anasazi
Spring 2006
For the past three decades, WSU archaeologists and their students have been searching the Southwest with tools ranging from trowels to computers to uncover the story of a vanished people.
Categories: Archaeology, Anthropology
Tags: Southwest United States, Anasazi, Native Americans

What I've Learned Since College: An interview with Rebecca Miles
Spring 2006
Last May, Rebecca Miles became the first woman and, at age 32, the youngest person to be elected chairman of the Nez Perce tribe. In her one-year post representing the 3,000 members of the tribe, Miles has traveled the country speaking on issues l...
Categories: Alumni, Cultural studies
Tags: Nez Perce, Idaho, Native Americans

Growing as an Artist
Spring 2006
Isaac Powell, a graduate student in the Department of Fine Arts, recently won national attention for his work when a piece took grand prize in a juried competition for young artists with disabilities. The competition winners are now part of a trav...
Categories: Fine Arts, Awards and honors
Tags: Museums, Artists

Doggy Dream House
Spring 2006
Basil was a dog in need of a home. And with just 30 hours to assess the whippet's personality and create and execute a design, a group of Washington State University design students were determined to give him one.It was an intense competition wit...
Categories: Engineering, Architecture and design, WSU Spokane
Tags: No Tags

Growing as an Artist
Spring 2006
windows along the north wall look out over Martin Stadium. They offer quite a view, especially on game days, says Powell. On one wall hang two of his latest pieces, paintings on birch plywood, a medium he says gives him more of a feeling of perman...
Categories: Visual arts, Fine Arts
Tags: Artists

Web Extra :: Grape expectations: A look at Washington's wine
Winter 2005
From the biggest winery in the state to the smallest boutique producer, Washington State University alumni are making wine and growing grapes in every one of Washington's appellations. Here's the list of the wineries with WSU connections that we'v...
Categories: Agriculture, Alumni
Tags: Wine

The Fixer
Winter 2005
A new hotel in an old Seattle landmarkAt Fourth and Virginia in Seattle, where Belltown meets downtown a few blocks from Pike Place Market, a trendy restaurant and residential district meets up with the city's retail center. It's here that hoteli...
Categories: Alumni, Business
Tags: Hotel management

Washington's wine crush
Winter 2005
From Whidbey Island to Woodinville to Walla Walla, Washington's wine industry is coming of age.
Categories: Agriculture, Food
Tags: Wine tasting, Wine, Grapes

A Sweet Buzz: Honey
Winter 2005
Entomologist Steve Sheppard has never gotten over his wonder at how people came to raise swarms of stinging insects for the honey they produce."To see this guy dumping out thousands of bees to collect honey from their hive. . ." He shakes his head...
Categories: Entomology, Food
Tags: Bees, Honey

Medieval Missive: An ancient document rediscovered
Winter 2005
A sacred and significant artifact of European history-a genuine papal bull from the Middle Ages-was recently found tucked among the books and papers of Washington State University's Manuscripts, Archives, and Special Collections.The bull, or bulla...
Categories: Religion, Literature
Tags: The Pope

What I've Learned Since College: an interview with Theodore Baseler
Winter 2005
Ted Baseler is president and CEO of Ste. Michelle Wine Estates. The interview with Hannelore Sudermann took place in his second-floor office at the Chateau Ste. Michelle in Woodinville in late July. Journeying from advertising and marketing into t...
Categories: Business, Alumni
Tags: Wine

Being Sacagawea
Winter 2005
For the past two years historian Jeanne Eder has been traveling in Sacagawea's footsteps. Donning a traditional dress as well as another woman's persona, Eder has toured the West performing her interpretation of an older and wiser Sacagawea who, y...
Categories: Alumni, History
Tags: Native Americans

Web Extra :: If clothes could talk...but they do!
Fall 2005
Photographs by Hannelore Sudermann There's more than one way to be Coug, as our gallery of student styles demonstrates. If clothes could talk, they'd speak volumes about the lifestyles and affiliations of their wearers. And, in fact, they ...
Categories: WSU students, Campus life, Visual arts
Tags: Apparel design, Fashion

Camp Larson—a heritage reclaimed
Fall 2005
For the first time in maybe a century, ceremonial songs of the Coeur d'Alene tribe floated across Cottonwood Bay on Lake Coeur d'Alene last spring. The Coeur d'Alenes were reclaiming a portion of their ancestral lands, a place where they can conne...
Categories: WSU history
Tags: Native Americans, Education

Web Extra :: Tortilla soup recipe from American Diabetes Association
Fall 2005
This is a wonderful and easy soup to prepare. Epazote is a Mexican herb with a strong flavor, so adjust the amount to your preference!Serves 4. Serving size: 1 cup6 6-inch corn tortillas 1 Tbsp canola oil 1 medium onion, peeled and finely cho...
Categories: Food, Health sciences
Tags: Recipe, Diabetes

Where Have You Gone, Edward R. Murrow?
Fall 2005
Edward R. Murrow '30 broadcasted reports from a London rooftop during the Blitz. He confronted Joseph McCarthy on national television. And he admitted "an abiding fear regarding what . . .[radio and TV] are doing to our society, and our heritage."
Categories: WSU history, Media, Communication
Tags: Edward R. Murrow, Journalism, Radio, Broadcasting

How Coug Are You?
Fall 2005
Would you paint your airplane crimson and gray? Or drive hundreds of miles to wave the Cougar flag at a non-Coug game? Or keep a concrete cougar in your yard? Well, how Coug are you?
Categories: Alumni, WSU students
Tags: Fashion, Cougar gear, Cougar pride

Heart Trouble
Fall 2005
Last fall workers planted a painted bronze heart sculpture by internationally known artist Jim Dine just steps from Stadium Way on one of Washington State University's busiest intersections.Painted bright blue, the sculpture stands about 12 feet hi...
Categories: Campus life, Fine Arts
Tags: Sculpture

What I've Learned Since College: an interview with Judy Dann
Fall 2005
Judy Dann graduated from Washington State University in 1985 with a degree in engineering and soon found a job with the City of Tacoma. Her life changed dramatically one day when she was hit by a car while crossing a street in Seattle. The acciden...
Categories: Alumni
Tags: Disabilities

Cracking the Code
Fall 2005
Nevins talks quickly and waves his hands when describing his own special tools, the challenges of making rings out of fragile marble ... "I get daily requests for plans," he says.Justin Nevins loved all the riddles in The DaVinci Code, the secret...
Categories: Puzzles, Alumni
Tags: Cryptex

Asparagus
Summer 2005
Toppenish-area farmer Kevin Bouchey has an affinity for asparagus, which his family has been growing since 1979. "It's a funny crop," says Bouchey, who also farms wheat and potatoes. "In a given farm year, you usually grow a plant and then harvest...
Categories: Agriculture
Tags: Asparagus, Farmers

Happy 25th, KZUU!
Summer 2005
It was a rock 'n' roll idea in a Bee Gees world.In 1977, a time of flared pants and patchwork shirts, a small group of determined students at Washington State University wanted a voice that could reach beyond campus. They wanted an outlet that was...
Categories: WSU history, Music
Tags: KZUU, Radio

What I've Learned Since College: an interview with King County Sheriff Sue Rahr
Summer 2005
Sue Rahr graduated from Washington State University in 1979 with a degree in criminal justice. In January 2005 she was promoted from King County chief of field operations to sheriff. She is the first woman to be sheriff of King County. The followi...
Categories: Alumni
Tags: Law enforcement

Washington State loves its literature
Summer 2005
In a report released last summer, the National Endowment for the Arts warned that literary reading has declined over the last 20 years. Scary stuff, huh? So we did our own informal survey of faculty, students, and alums. Their response? Read on!
Categories: Literature, Campus life
Tags: Books, Reading, Library

Shock Physics: Power, Pressure, and People
Summer 2005
After the Soviet Union tested its first nuclear device, the U.S. determined that staying ahead in the arms race would require the best scientists and the best weapons. A new federal funding model emerged, channeling money into universities around the country for research and the training of the next generation of national scientists. By the late 1950s, WSU had started on shock-wave research.
Categories: Physics
Tags: National laboratories, Shock physics, Nuclear physics

Bear Bones: A Murder Mystery
Summer 2005
It must have been easy to drop the body into this part of Pullman, a section that sees so little traffic. The old county road was research land where hardly anyone but the groundskeepers ventured. But somebody had an ugly secret to hide.
Categories: Campus life, Entomology
Tags: Crimes, Death, Forensics

The End of an Era
Spring 2005
Broken bones, lacerations, and late-night illnesses were among the thousands of maladies that brought students through the doors of Pullman's community hospital during its 57 years on Washington State University's campus.But that era ended Decembe...
Categories: WSU history
Tags: Health and Wellness Services, Pullman life

Anna Grant—A life of firsts
Spring 2005
Anna Harvin Grant, the first woman to earn a doctorate in sociology from Washington State University, died November 6, 2004, of heart failure. She was 81.A nationally recognized expert in Black family life and former chair of the Department of Soc...
Categories: Alumni, Sociology
Tags: African Americans