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McCroskey Hall History

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Completed in 1920 as a women’s dormitory, McCroskey Residence Hall was named after R.C. McCroskey, a prominent Garfield rancher and banker who was a member of the Board of Regents from 1897-1905 and 1909-1922. R.C. McCroskey also served in the state senate in the 1891 and 1893 sessions. Later, his grandson Ronald McCroskey created a scholarship for the WSU Honors College. This building is the second oldest standing residence hall on campus. Only Stevens Hall, completed in 1896, and Ferry Hall completed in 1900 but razed in 1975, preceded it.

Like architect Rudolph Weaver’s other buildings, the design is Neo-Classical. The north-facing entry is accented with a fine central feature of stone pilasters. Elsewhere the pilasters are brick with stone capitals. The very heavy entablature below the attic story seems over scaled, particularly as it was painted in 1985.

Today, McCroskey Hall serves as a co-ed residence hall.

<gallery> image: Mccroskey1933.jpg|McCroskey Hall in 1933. Photo courtesy of WSU Manuscripts, Archives, and Special Collections. image: Mccroskeygirls1974.jpg|McCroskey girls in 1974. Photo courtesy of WSU Manuscripts, Archives, and Special Collections. image: Mccroskey1.jpg|McCroskey Hall. Photo courtesy of WSU Manuscripts, Archives, and Special Collections. image: Mccroskey1921.jpg|McCroskey Hall in 1921. Photo courtesy of WSU Manuscripts, Archives, and Special Collections.

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