SPRING 2014
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Mountains and rivers and prairies without end
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Features

Mountains and Rivers and Prairies Without End—Recollecting Washington’s landscapes :: “The whole concept has burgeoned ... to one where the landscape is part of why people select to live in certain locations, has political meaning, has religious meaning, has all of these other kinds of meaning.” by Tim Steury

{ WEB EXCLUSIVE–Trips: Washington road trips from Tim Steury and Kathleen Flenniken}

A True Story Fraught with Peril :: Buried in hundreds of layers of rock are tales of fire, brimstone, destruction, and fragility. by Eric Sorensen

{ WEB EXCLUSIVE–Trips: Flood Basalts and Glacier Floods: Roadside Geology of Parts of Walla Walla, Franklin, and Columbia Counties, Washington }

A Dose of Reason—Pediatric specialists advocate for vaccines :: In 2011, Washington’s vaccination rate was dangerously low. According to the CDC, 6.2 percent of children in kindergarten had not been fully immunized. by Hannelore Sudermann

An inquiring mind :: Ken Alexander ’82, chief of pediatric infectious diseases at the University of Chicago’s Comer Children’s Hospital.

Essay

On the Road :: Washington’s Poet Laureate brings poetry to, and discovers it in, each of the state’s 39 counties. by Kathleen Flenniken ’83

Panoramas

:: Backyard boarders

:: Google ranking molecules

:: Music to a closed country

:: The calculus of caring and cooperation

:: Sorting debitage from rubble

:: A wider canvas

:: Predictive software helps communication

{ WEB EXCLUSIVE–Video: WSU chemist applies Google software to webs of the molecular world }

Departments

:: First Words

:: Posts

:: Sports: After the games

:: In Season: What about buckwheat?

:: Last Words: Everyone could use a lift

{ WEB EXCLUSIVE–Recipe: Sonoko Sakai’s Nihachi Soba Noodles }

{ WEB EXCLUSIVE–Video: Campus shortcuts }

Tracking

:: Robert Franklin ’75, ’76, ’79—A new leash on life

:: Pavlo Rudenko ’09—As fast as he can go

:: Nancy Gillett ’78—The business of science

:: Alumni news: Two alumni recognized for their contributions to food and agriculture

{ WEB EXCLUSIVE–Guide: A Guide to TriboTeX Nano-based Lubricant }

New Media

Soldiers of Paint by Doug Gritzmacher ’98 and Michael DeChant Jr.

Civility and Democracy in America: A Reasonable Understanding edited by Cornell W. Clayton and Richard Elgar

A Yankee on Puget Sound by Karen L. Johnson ’78 and Dennis M. Larsen ’68

New & Noteworthy: Operation Cody: An Undercover Investigation of Illegal Wildlife Trafficking in Washington State by Todd A. Vandivert ’79; Isaiah Shembe’s Prophetic Uhlanga by Joel E. Tishken; The Business of Android Apps Development/Taking Your Kindle Fire to the Max/LEGO Technic Robotics/Practical LEGO Technics by Mark Rollins ’94

On the cover: “Washington Road Trips” by John S. Dykes

newon site

Poverty in children's books
January 8, 2014 : Story
School is starting back up for a lot of children. But do kid's books show the facts about poverty? Jane Kelley at the WSU College of Education has lo...Read more

Magical baked beans
January 2, 2014 : Recipe
Cold wintry weather just begs for baked beans. Check out a recipe for Grandma Smith's Rockwell Baked Beans at the magazine site. The Rockwell Bean is...Read more

Booze, Sex, and Reality Checks
September 20, 2013 : Video
Students at WSU are given the opportunity to explore what they expect and want from a university social experience, including alcohol use and sexual ...Read more

A History of Alderbrook Resort
April 16, 2013 : Video
Celebrating a century on Hood Canal: Washington State University Hospitality alumnus Brian McGinnis ’77 talks about the history and renovation ...Read more

Shopping with Oranges: Simple scents in retail
April 16, 2013 : Video
Simple scents, like orange, can enhance the retail environment for shoppers, says Eric Spangenberg, dean of the College of Business at Washington Sta...Read more

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Fall 2013 :: Watch full-size :: More videos

Starting near sunset, workers cut the long green vines from their trellises and truck them off to farm buildings to be stripped. From there the hop cones are dried, baled, and shipped to breweries.

Summer 2007

Starting near sunset, workers cut the long green vines from their trellises and truck them off to farm buildings to be stripped. From there the hop cones are dried, baled, and shipped to breweries.

Read more in Hops & beer